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I am starting use PETSc library to solve linear system of equations in parallel. I have installed all packages, build and run successfully the examples in petsc/src/ksp/ksp/examples/tutorials/ folder, for example ex.c

But I couldn't understand how to fill matrices A,X an B by reading them for example from file.

Here I provide the code within ex2.c file:

/* Program usage:  mpiexec -n <procs> ex2 [-help] [all PETSc options] */ 

static char help[] = "Solves a linear system in parallel with KSP.\n\
Input parameters include:\n\
  -random_exact_sol : use a random exact solution vector\n\
  -view_exact_sol   : write exact solution vector to stdout\n\
  -m <mesh_x>       : number of mesh points in x-direction\n\
  -n <mesh_n>       : number of mesh points in y-direction\n\n";

/*T
   Concepts: KSP^basic parallel example;
   Concepts: KSP^Laplacian, 2d
   Concepts: Laplacian, 2d
   Processors: n
T*/

/* 
  Include "petscksp.h" so that we can use KSP solvers.  Note that this file
  automatically includes:
     petscsys.h       - base PETSc routines   petscvec.h - vectors
     petscmat.h - matrices
     petscis.h     - index sets            petscksp.h - Krylov subspace methods
     petscviewer.h - viewers               petscpc.h  - preconditioners
*/
#include <C:\PETSC\include\petscksp.h>

#undef __FUNCT__
#define __FUNCT__ "main"
int main(int argc,char **args)
{
  Vec            x,b,u;  /* approx solution, RHS, exact solution */
  Mat            A;        /* linear system matrix */
  KSP            ksp;     /* linear solver context */
  PetscRandom    rctx;     /* random number generator context */
  PetscReal      norm;     /* norm of solution error */
  PetscInt       i,j,Ii,J,Istart,Iend,m = 8,n = 7,its;
  PetscErrorCode ierr;
  PetscBool      flg = PETSC_FALSE;
  PetscScalar    v;
#if defined(PETSC_USE_LOG)
  PetscLogStage  stage;
#endif

  PetscInitialize(&argc,&args,(char *)0,help);
  ierr = PetscOptionsGetInt(PETSC_NULL,"-m",&m,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = PetscOptionsGetInt(PETSC_NULL,"-n",&n,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  /* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
         Compute the matrix and right-hand-side vector that define
         the linear system, Ax = b.
     - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - */
  /* 
     Create parallel matrix, specifying only its global dimensions.
     When using MatCreate(), the matrix format can be specified at
     runtime. Also, the parallel partitioning of the matrix is
     determined by PETSc at runtime.

     Performance tuning note:  For problems of substantial size,
     preallocation of matrix memory is crucial for attaining good 
     performance. See the matrix chapter of the users manual for details.
  */
  ierr = MatCreate(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,&A);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatSetSizes(A,PETSC_DECIDE,PETSC_DECIDE,m*n,m*n);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatSetFromOptions(A);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatMPIAIJSetPreallocation(A,5,PETSC_NULL,5,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatSeqAIJSetPreallocation(A,5,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
     Currently, all PETSc parallel matrix formats are partitioned by
     contiguous chunks of rows across the processors.  Determine which
     rows of the matrix are locally owned. 
  */
  ierr = MatGetOwnershipRange(A,&Istart,&Iend);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
     Set matrix elements for the 2-D, five-point stencil in parallel.
      - Each processor needs to insert only elements that it owns
        locally (but any non-local elements will be sent to the
        appropriate processor during matrix assembly). 
      - Always specify global rows and columns of matrix entries.

     Note: this uses the less common natural ordering that orders first
     all the unknowns for x = h then for x = 2h etc; Hence you see J = Ii +- n
     instead of J = I +- m as you might expect. The more standard ordering
     would first do all variables for y = h, then y = 2h etc.

   */
  ierr = PetscLogStageRegister("Assembly", &stage);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = PetscLogStagePush(stage);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  for (Ii=Istart; Ii<Iend; Ii++) { 
    v = -1.0; i = Ii/n; j = Ii - i*n;  
    if (i>0)   {J = Ii - n; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);}
    if (i<m-1) {J = Ii + n; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);}
    if (j>0)   {J = Ii - 1; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);}
    if (j<n-1) {J = Ii + 1; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);}
    v = 4.0; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&Ii,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  }

  /* 
     Assemble matrix, using the 2-step process:
       MatAssemblyBegin(), MatAssemblyEnd()
     Computations can be done while messages are in transition
     by placing code between these two statements.
  */
  ierr = MatAssemblyBegin(A,MAT_FINAL_ASSEMBLY);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatAssemblyEnd(A,MAT_FINAL_ASSEMBLY);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = PetscLogStagePop();CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* A is symmetric. Set symmetric flag to enable ICC/Cholesky preconditioner */
  ierr = MatSetOption(A,MAT_SYMMETRIC,PETSC_TRUE);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
     Create parallel vectors.
      - We form 1 vector from scratch and then duplicate as needed.
      - When using VecCreate(), VecSetSizes and VecSetFromOptions()
        in this example, we specify only the
        vector's global dimension; the parallel partitioning is determined
        at runtime. 
      - When solving a linear system, the vectors and matrices MUST
        be partitioned accordingly.  PETSc automatically generates
        appropriately partitioned matrices and vectors when MatCreate()
        and VecCreate() are used with the same communicator.  
      - The user can alternatively specify the local vector and matrix
        dimensions when more sophisticated partitioning is needed
        (replacing the PETSC_DECIDE argument in the VecSetSizes() statement
        below).
  */
  ierr = VecCreate(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,&u);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = VecSetSizes(u,PETSC_DECIDE,m*n);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = VecSetFromOptions(u);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = VecDuplicate(u,&b);CHKERRQ(ierr); 
  ierr = VecDuplicate(b,&x);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
     Set exact solution; then compute right-hand-side vector.
     By default we use an exact solution of a vector with all
     elements of 1.0;  Alternatively, using the runtime option
     -random_sol forms a solution vector with random components.
  */
  ierr = PetscOptionsGetBool(PETSC_NULL,"-random_exact_sol",&flg,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  if (flg) {
    ierr = PetscRandomCreate(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,&rctx);CHKERRQ(ierr);
    ierr = PetscRandomSetFromOptions(rctx);CHKERRQ(ierr);
    ierr = VecSetRandom(u,rctx);CHKERRQ(ierr);
    ierr = PetscRandomDestroy(&rctx);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  } else {
    ierr = VecSet(u,1.0);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  }
  ierr = MatMult(A,u,b);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /*
     View the exact solution vector if desired
  */
  flg  = PETSC_FALSE;
  ierr = PetscOptionsGetBool(PETSC_NULL,"-view_exact_sol",&flg,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  if (flg) {ierr = VecView(u,PETSC_VIEWER_STDOUT_WORLD);CHKERRQ(ierr);}

  /* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
                Create the linear solver and set various options
     - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - */

  /* 
     Create linear solver context
  */
  ierr = KSPCreate(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,&ksp);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
     Set operators. Here the matrix that defines the linear system
     also serves as the preconditioning matrix.
  */
  ierr = KSPSetOperators(ksp,A,A,DIFFERENT_NONZERO_PATTERN);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
     Set linear solver defaults for this problem (optional).
     - By extracting the KSP and PC contexts from the KSP context,
       we can then directly call any KSP and PC routines to set
       various options.
     - The following two statements are optional; all of these
       parameters could alternatively be specified at runtime via
       KSPSetFromOptions().  All of these defaults can be
       overridden at runtime, as indicated below.
  */
  ierr = KSPSetTolerances(ksp,1.e-2/((m+1)*(n+1)),1.e-50,PETSC_DEFAULT,
                          PETSC_DEFAULT);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* 
    Set runtime options, e.g.,
        -ksp_type <type> -pc_type <type> -ksp_monitor -ksp_rtol <rtol>
    These options will override those specified above as long as
    KSPSetFromOptions() is called _after_ any other customization
    routines.
  */
  ierr = KSPSetFromOptions(ksp);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
                      Solve the linear system
     - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - */

  ierr = KSPSolve(ksp,b,x);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
                      Check solution and clean up
     - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - */

  /* 
     Check the error
  */
  ierr = VecAXPY(x,-1.0,u);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = VecNorm(x,NORM_2,&norm);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = KSPGetIterationNumber(ksp,&its);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  /* Scale the norm */
  /*  norm *= sqrt(1.0/((m+1)*(n+1))); */

  /*
     Print convergence information.  PetscPrintf() produces a single 
     print statement from all processes that share a communicator.
     An alternative is PetscFPrintf(), which prints to a file.
  */
  ierr = PetscPrintf(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,"Norm of error %A iterations %D\n",
                     norm,its);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /*
     Free work space.  All PETSc objects should be destroyed when they
     are no longer needed.
  */
  ierr = KSPDestroy(&ksp);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = VecDestroy(&u);CHKERRQ(ierr);  ierr = VecDestroy(&x);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = VecDestroy(&b);CHKERRQ(ierr);  ierr = MatDestroy(&A);CHKERRQ(ierr);

  /*
     Always call PetscFinalize() before exiting a program.  This routine
       - finalizes the PETSc libraries as well as MPI
       - provides summary and diagnostic information if certain runtime
         options are chosen (e.g., -log_summary). 
  */
  ierr = PetscFinalize();
  return 0;
}

Does someone know how to fill own matrices within examples?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yeah, this can be a little daunting when you're getting started. There's a good walk-through of the process in this ACTS tutorial from 2006; the tutorials listed on the PetSC web page are generally quite good.

The key parts of this are:

  ierr = MatCreate(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,&A);CHKERRQ(ierr);

Actually create the PetSC matrix object, Mat A;

  ierr = MatSetSizes(A,PETSC_DECIDE,PETSC_DECIDE,m*n,m*n);CHKERRQ(ierr);

set the sizes; here, the matrix is m*n x m*n, as it's a stencil for operating on an m x n 2d grid

  ierr = MatSetFromOptions(A);CHKERRQ(ierr);

This just takes any PetSC command line options that you might have supplied at run time and apply them to the matrix, if you wanted to control how A was set up; otherwise, you could just, have eg, used MatCreateMPIAIJ() to create it as an AIJ-format matrix (the default), MatCreateMPIDense() if it was going to be a dense matrix.

  ierr = MatMPIAIJSetPreallocation(A,5,PETSC_NULL,5,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatSeqAIJSetPreallocation(A,5,PETSC_NULL);CHKERRQ(ierr);

Now that we've gotten an AIJ matrix, these calls just pre-allocates the sparse matrix, assuming 5 non-zeros per row. This is for performance. Note that both the MPI and Seq functions must be called to make sure this works with both 1 processor and multiple processors; this always seemed weird to be, but there you go.

Ok, now that the matrix is all set up, here's where we start getting into the actual meat of the matter.

First, we find out which rows this particular process owns. The distribution is by rows, which is a good distribution for typical sparse matrices.

  ierr = MatGetOwnershipRange(A,&Istart,&Iend);CHKERRQ(ierr);

So after this call, each processor has its own version of Istart and Iend, and its this processors job to update rows starting at Istart end ending just before Iend, as you see in this for loop:

  for (Ii=Istart; Ii<Iend; Ii++) { 
    v = -1.0; i = Ii/n; j = Ii - i*n;  

Ok, so if we're operating on row Ii, this corresponds to grid location (i,j) where i = Ii/n and j = Ii % n. Eg, grid location (i,j) corresponds to row Ii = i*n + j. Makes sense?

I'm going to strip out the if statements here because they're important but they're just dealing with the boundary values and they make things more complicated.

In this row, there will be a +4 on the diagonal, and -1s at columns corresponding to (i-1,j), (i+1,j), (i,j-1), and (i,j+1). Assuming that we haven't gone off the end of the grid for these (eg, 1 < i < m-1 and 1 < j < n-1), that means

    J = Ii - n; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);
    J = Ii + n; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);
    J = Ii - 1; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);
    J = Ii + 1; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&J,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);

    v = 4.0; ierr = MatSetValues(A,1,&Ii,1,&Ii,&v,INSERT_VALUES);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  }

The if statements I took out just avoid setting those values if they don't exist, and the CHKERRQ macro just prints out a useful error if ierr != 0, eg the set values call failed (because we tried to set an invalid value).

Now we've set local values; the MatAssembly calls start communication to ensure any necessary values are exchanged between processors. If you have any unrelated work to do, it can be stuck between the Begin and End to try to overlap communication and computation:

  ierr = MatAssemblyBegin(A,MAT_FINAL_ASSEMBLY);CHKERRQ(ierr);
  ierr = MatAssemblyEnd(A,MAT_FINAL_ASSEMBLY);CHKERRQ(ierr);

And now you're done and can call your solvers.

So a typical workflow is:

  • Create your matrix (MatCreate)
  • Set its size (MatSetSizes)
  • Set various matrix options (MatSetFromOptions is a good choice, rather than hardcoding things)
  • For sparse matrices, set the preallocation to reasonable guesses for the number of non-zeros per row; you can do this with a single value (as here), or with an array representing the number of non-zeros per row (here filled in with PETSC_NULL): (MatMPIAIJSetPreallocation, MatSeqAIJSetPreallocation)
  • Find out which rows are your responsibility: (MatGetOwnershipRange)
  • Set the values (calling MatSetValues either once per value, or passing in a chunk of values; INSERT_VALUES sets new elements, ADD_VALUES increments any existing elements)
  • Then do the assembly (MatAssemblyBegin,MatAssemblyEnd).

Other more complicated use cases are possible.

share|improve this answer
    
this needs more up votes –  pyCthon Sep 22 '12 at 21:42

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