Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

we've (probably) got upcoming law in the Netherlands where i have to ask users if they allow me to use cookies on my site. Now it's easy when they say 'yes', because i can store that in a cookie.

You can see it coming: how can i remember the users choice when they say 'no'?

I only use cookies for Google analytics, so i can live with the 'no' answer and don't want to irritate the 'No' sayer every visit with the same question.

share|improve this question
    
If user don't let you store cookie he has to be ready for dump questions every time :) –  Ruben Nagoga May 30 '12 at 11:54
    
@ruben I tend to agree, but if a 'normal' users gets a question like this 'do you want to use cookies' and he has to read on some wiki pages what cookies are (can you clearify it to non-techies?) i can imagine that a user chooses 'No' –  Michel May 30 '12 at 11:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe Local Storage in supported browsers for more or less permanent persisting

share|improve this answer
    
The official law text only mentions 'cookies', so that will be save i think. Typing this makes me wonder: the reason for the new law is to give the user the option to prevent the tracking-cookies to be placed on the users machine, because the tracking cookies can lead to a privacy issue. But with the local storage, the 'trackers' can accomplish the same without cookies, using local storage? –  Michel May 30 '12 at 12:03
1  
Main difference is that local storage is truly local, its contents are not send back and forth with requests. Server can never actually get informed about data in local storage –  archil May 30 '12 at 12:06
    
While I'm not 100% sure I believe that the law also includes local/sessionStorage. –  Johan Jun 6 '12 at 10:28

well then you can use html5's localstorage/sessionstorage objects for your requirement. these are very well supported on all the modern browsers. visit here for more details about HTML5 storage.

share|improve this answer

You will need to use url-rewritting as a fallback approach

share|improve this answer
    
He cannot persist info into url, as this will work only until user has closed browser. On every new visit, answer is lost –  archil May 30 '12 at 11:54
    
yes..url rewritting will help only if he needs to remember for current session. If he needs to remember the data even after closing browser than probably an local storage apporach which you suggested might come handy. –  Kshitij May 30 '12 at 11:59
    
Remembering the option is probably not an option since I believe the law includes localStorage and alike. re-writing the url is probably the best option due to lack of other options. –  Johan Jun 6 '12 at 10:29

You can use Local storage

Please check this

  1. Why Local Storage
  2. How to use Local Storage
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not 100% sure but I believe that the law also includes local/sessionStorage aswell as cookies. So this is not an option :( –  Johan Jun 6 '12 at 10:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.