Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The simple code block below can be served up in a static HTML page but results in a JavaScript error. How should you escape the embedded double quote in the onClick handler (i.e. \"xyz)? Note that the HTML is generated dynamically by pulling data from a database, the data of which is snippets of other HTML code that could have either single or double quotes. It seems that adding a single backslash ahead of the double quote character doesn't do the trick.

<script type="text/javascript">
    function parse(a, b, c) {
        alert(c);
    }
</script>

<a href="#x" onclick="parse('#', false, '<a href=\"xyz'); return false">Test</a>
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Did you try

&quot; or \x22

instead of

\"

?

share|improve this answer
6  
I just tested this in FF3.6 and IE8 under a similar scenario and it didn't work. However replacing the " with &quot; did. I also tested the exact code above and it worked both ways. In short the \x22 does not appear to work under all scenarios and you should try &quot; in that event. –  SpliFF Jun 18 '10 at 8:40
2  
Nice. &quot; seems to work in html tag attributes in Webkit and Firefox and Opera. –  NoBugs Jun 15 '11 at 19:19

It needs to be HTML-escaped, not Javascript-escaped. Change \" to &quot;.

share|improve this answer

While I agree with CMS about doing this in an unobtrusive manner (via a lib like jquery or dojo), here's what also work:

<script type="text/javascript">
function parse(a, b, c) {
    alert(c);
  }

</script>

<a href="#x" onclick="parse('#', false, 'xyc&quot;foo');return false;">Test</a>

The reason it barfs is not because of JavaScript, it's because of the HTML parser. It has no concept of escaped quotes to it trundles along looking for the end quote and finds it and returns that as the onclick function. This is invalid javascript though so you don't find about the error until JavaScript tries to execute the function..

share|improve this answer
2  
Downvote. You do NOT need a framework for something like this! –  anonymous coward Jul 4 '09 at 6:20
    
+1 for &quot;... –  Greg Jul 4 '09 at 6:24

You may also want to try two backslashes (\\") to escape the escape character.

share|improve this answer
1  
Classic. Stackoverflow ate one of your backslashes and displayed only the other one. I fixed it for you. –  Nosredna Jul 4 '09 at 5:44
1  
Oops, thanks. Wonder if that happened to the OP. –  Mark A. Nicolosi Jul 4 '09 at 14:36

I think that the best approach is to assign the onclick handler unobtrusively.

Something like this:

window.onload = function(){
    var myLink = document.getElementsById('myLinkId');
    myLink.onclick = function(){ 
        parse('#', false, '<a href="xyz');
        return false;
    }
}

//...


<a href="#" id="myLink">Test</a>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.