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The following two queries gives the same output when run in R studio v_0.96

1)

ab<-sqldf('select a.Family_tree_id, a.parent_name
           from test as a, test as b 
           where a.child_id <> b.parent_id 
           group by a.Family_tree_id')

2)

cd<-sqldf('select a.Family_tree_id, a.parent_name
           from test as a
           where a.parent_name NOT IN 
           (select b.child_name from test as b)')

I don't seem to understand the reason behind the same answer though it seems the first one does an entirely different job than the second one. I am not very experienced in SQL so please bear with me. Is some more information about the dataset is required to answer this?

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2  
Please make this example reproducible by providing (a sample of) your data. – Paul Hiemstra May 30 '12 at 14:10

Though, as asked by Paul, the dataset would come in handy there are several overlaps between the two queries:

  • Both queries select people without children.
  • DISTINCT is a sort of easy GROUP BY to prevent duplicates, your first query would have the same result if there is only one childless parent per family tree-id.

Also, in your second query, , test as b serves no purpose.

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I knew that was your intention, but you already redefine b inside the (select b.child_name from test as b). So the , test as b above that isn't needed. – Vincent Vancalbergh May 30 '12 at 15:19
    
My mistake - can't count queries! – Jonathan Leffler May 30 '12 at 15:20
    
i m sorry .. forgot to remove the "test as b" in the second query.. i do see now there is no use of it.. i m providing my sample dataset – Bilal arif May 30 '12 at 15:52
    
It's ok, I would've expected an error that b was already defined (maybe). This isn't SQL Server so I'm not sure. – Vincent Vancalbergh May 30 '12 at 15:56
    
Family_tree_id child_id child_name parent_id parent_name 1 15764 Sherman_Miles 6574 Jason_Miles 1 6574 Jason_Miles 89657 Michael_Miles 1 89657 Michael_Miles 65428 William_Miles 2 98754 Robert_Jackson 35468 Michael_Jackson 2 35468 Michael_Jackson 65789 Jeremy_Jackson 2 65789 Jeremy_Jackson 3854 Randy_Jackson 2 3854 Randy_Jackson 69875 Marlon_Jackson 2 69875 Marlon_Jackson 325 Thomas_Jackson – Bilal arif May 30 '12 at 16:26

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