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I would like to do something fundamentally similar to this question:

Merge an untracked directory into the tracked directory

However, the answer there is not particularly helpful for my situation.

Basically, a colleague sent me his version of the code as a zip file. His version should be quite ahead of my version, but I can't just use his version because there are a couple of bug-fixes in my version that I don't believe are in his. What I would like to do is create a patch which contains only my contributions to the code and attempt to patch his (untracked) version with my changes.

Is this the same thing as checking out the revision before I started working on the code in a new branch, copying his files into that repo and committing it as a new branch, then merging that branch with mine? If so, how would I go about finding the first commit that I made in the directory in question?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use git log to show all the commits that have affected a specific path:

git log -- path/to/interesting/dir

Since you're only interested in your own commits, you'll also need the --author option:

git log --author=mgilson -- path/to/interesting/dir

The first commit in the directory is the last one in the list, which you could find with a combination of the --oneline option and tail:

git log --author=mgilson --oneline -- path/to/interesting/dir | tail -n1
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That's the first commit in the directory -- I want the first commit that I made in that directory. Something like git log --oneline -- path/to/dir | grep mgilson | tail -1 (but that doesn't work since the author of the commit isn't in the output with --oneline) –  mgilson May 30 '12 at 14:24
    
@mgilson: It wasn't clear from your question that there were commits from other users in the repository. I've updated my answer to also provide author filtering. –  georgebrock May 30 '12 at 15:15
    
Thanks, that'll do what I want. –  mgilson May 30 '12 at 15:35

Is this the same thing as checking out the revision before I started working on the code in a new branch, copying his files into that repo and committing it as a new branch, then merging that branch with mine?

Yes it should be the same, with the additional benefit to keep everything in the same referential.

how would I go about finding the first commit that I made in the directory in question?

A git bisect would be useful, in order to find the first "bad" commit (ie one where your directory exists).

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The directory exists in both cases -- I want to know when I first committed to that directory. -- It seems like I should just be able to grep git-log or something... –  mgilson May 30 '12 at 14:11

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