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I have created a simple method that detects collision between the two balls by calculating the distance. I was wondering, once the collision is detected, how could I update the balls positions to not allow the balls to enter each other(intersect)

    private void BallCollisionBlueRed()
    {
        double fDist;
        CentreAX = redBall.Left + ball.Width / 2;
        CentreAY = redBall.Top + ball.Height / 2;
        CentreBX = blueBall.Left + ball.Width / 2;
        CentreBY = blueBall.Top + ball.Height / 2;

        vDx = CentreBX - CentreAX;
        vDy = CentreBY - CentreAY;
        fDist = Math.Sqrt((vDx * vDx) + (vDy * vDy));

        if (fDist < radA + radB)
        {
           // Help!
        }
    }

vDx and vDy are only used to hold the value for the calculations. I am controlling both the balls with arrow keys(players), I don't want them to bounce off each other, but just not allow them to intersect.

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Where do you set the movement vector of the balls? that ought to be changed once you detect the collision. – Shai May 30 '12 at 13:25
    
hard to say without any information about the rest of your programm, you could "reset" the postion of the balls to one where they not intersecting each outher or you try some physic (that's waht i'd do) and calc the impulse of each ball and invert them (conservation of linear momentum). – Alex May 30 '12 at 13:26

You need to picture the interaction in your head. When the distance is exactly zero the objects will bounce and start moving away from each other.

It's been too long since college to calculate the new trajectory BUT the main thing will be that, if radA + radB - fDist is, say -4, you'll need to set the new distance to radA + radB + 4.

That will accomodate for any low fps you have (until they lag so bad that they go THROUGH each other before you can detect the collision :-p

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For some good advice on this type of physics in I would read this blog post: http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/2011/04/06/physics-engines-for-dummies/

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