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I've seen lots of flash games with online highscores. Not just flash games, gamemaker games as well. How does the server side verify that the client has REALLY received the score that it has claimed to make?

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closed as off topic by Wooble, Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp, Cheekysoft, Perception, Graviton Jun 1 '12 at 8:18

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far more appropriate for s.tk/gamedev or s.tk/security –  Cheekysoft May 30 '12 at 14:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Depends on how important it is to avoid cheaters. If it is not important, just trust the score coming from the client. If it is somewhat important, you might sign it with a key (though this key would need to be present in the client, and might be possible to reverse-engineer). If it is very important, you can monitor the entire course of the game, calculating the score on the server during play and detecting impossible actions; this will require cheaters to be able to play back an entire plausible game to your server in order to get you to trust their score.

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Well I want to definitely avoid cheaters, but I think it will be a tad much to process an entire course of physics on my server. –  Keysle May 30 '12 at 19:12

For a game I made (not in flash) I dynamically provided a salt and the client code had to use this salt to make a hash of a few things (user name, IP, whole game, score) that I could verify on my server. This combined with a few things like debug detection (time based) seems to me to be strong enough for most cases.

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