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I have these two queries running on Oracle:

select B.* from (
    select A.*, rownum as rn  from (
        select * from .... order by ...
    ) A  ) B  where  B.rn > 0 and B.rn <=30;

and

select B.* from (
    select A.*, rownum as rn  from (
        select * from .... order by ...
    ) A  where  rownum <= 30 ) B  where  rn > 0 

In fact the results of these queries are different. First one looks more correct. Why?

Problem with the second approach is: when I run it for 0-30 interval it looks ok on the first glance. But when I run it for 30-60 interval I've found out that 30-60 results do contain the entry which I've already seen in 0-30 results (which obviously shouldn't happen).

UPD: I just found out that it probably could work not correctly because of my order by clause produce not unique sorting. So it does not sort by PK, but by clientName for example, and there could be plenty of equal clients in the results. So, can it be the reason? How oracle orders entries when the order in fact is undefined? In case of paging order should be pretty much defined, for results to be stable when we're switching between pages.

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3  
    
no... they suggest to use exactly the second approach I've used. But it works wrongly as I described above –  javagirl May 30 '12 at 13:46
1  
With regard to your ordering question, the order of the results is not deterministic if the order-by columns are not unique. they might give the impression of stability but that's just because the query execution plan is stable at the time and the data hasn't changed. You can't rely on it at all. –  David Aldridge May 30 '12 at 14:40
1  
@DavidAldridge, so you mean for the stable paging work I always need order by unique columns? it might be the case... I'll check –  javagirl May 30 '12 at 14:58
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1 Answer 1

You are referencing the column alias "rn", which is derived from the rownum allocated in the inner query prior to the orderby being applied.

Instead, reference rownum in the outer query.

select *
from (
  select   *
  from     ...
  order by ...
) 
where rownum between 1 and 30;

Or ...

Rownum 0 doesn't exist, by the way.

select *
from (
  select   a.*, rownum rn
  from (
    select   *
    from     ...
    order by ...
    ) a
  where rownum < 60
) 
where rn >= 30
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So, why my first query is working better than second one...? –  javagirl May 30 '12 at 14:09
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