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How do I write following BNF Grammar in ANTLR?

literal = "{" number "}" CRLF *CHAR8
        ; Number represents the number of CHAR8s

For example {6}\r\nLENGTH should be mapped to "LENGTH" string.

Will following work?

literal: 
   | '{' ('0'..'9')+ '}\r\n'  
        {  
            // C# Code for Lexer
            Text = Text.Trim();
            int n = int.Parse(Text.Substring(1,Text.Length-2));
            Text = "";
            for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
               input.Consume();
            }            
        }
  ;

I am getting this working as a Lexer rule, but problem is I am getting mismatched token, I am not getting token as literal.

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Would a solution that does this in 2 steps be ok? e.g. pass two checks that the number to the left and the string to the right are the same length. –  user7116 May 30 '12 at 14:32
    
I didnt get you, I dont know much about ANTLR and I just saw its generated C# and based on that I have written this, the problem is, it has few methods such as LeaveRule etc, I want to know what shall be my last statement? LeaveRule() should be called or not. –  Akash Kava May 30 '12 at 14:35
    
@SwDevMan81 why C# was removed from here? The target language for ANTLR grammar is C# –  Akash Kava May 30 '12 at 15:35
    
@BartKiers, sorry, typo, yes I corrected it to 6 chars. –  Akash Kava May 30 '12 at 15:38
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This solution works correctly,

literal: 
   | '{' ('0'..'9')+ '}\r\n'  
        {  
            // C# Code for Lexer
            Text = Text.Trim();
            int n = int.Parse(Text.Substring(1,Text.Length-2));
            Text = "";
            for(int i=0;i<n+1;i++){
               Text += (char) input.LA(1);
               input.Consume();
            }            
        }
  ;

Text += (char)input.LA(1); was missing and for some reason, we have to count i from 0 to n+1.

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