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I tried to sum pixels values on black and white area, through dividing the image into a grid of blocks and getting the sum of pixels for each block.

When I printed the values of each, the values were all the same = 255. My question is: Why does this happen? Some blocks have only black pixels and some have black and white?

double* divide (Mat I)
         {
             //double* pointer;
         static double*  sums= new double [9];
        //pointer= sums[0];
          //double sums2[10];

          Mat block;
              //Mat block2;

    int numberblocks=9; 
    int bh;
    int bw;
    //int bh2;
    //int bw2;

    bh=I.cols/numberblocks;
    bw=I.rows/numberblocks; 
    //bh2=u.cols/numberblocks;
    //bw2=u.rows/numberblocks; 
    //
    double blockarea=bh*bw;
    //double num=0;
    //double blockarea2=bh2*bw2;

    //int r=0;
    //int c=0;
    //int err=0;

    for(int a=0;a<9;a++)
    {
       for (int r = 0; r < I.rows; r += bw)
       {
             for (int c = 0; c < I.cols; c += bh)
                 {

                 block  = I(cv::Range(r, min(r + bw, I.rows)),cv::Range(c, min(c + bh, I.cols)));


                  }
       }
       double sum=0;

         for(int i=0;i<block.rows;i++)
         {
             for(int j=0;j<block.cols;j++)
                 {
                sums[a] = sum + block.at<uchar>(i,j); //sums[k-1] + block.at<uchar>(i,j);
             }
         }
         cout<<"sum of"<<a<<"is"<<sums[a]<<endl;


    }


return sums;

}    
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1  
Please make sure to properly format your code if you want us to take a look at it. The better it looks, the easier it is to help. –  Bart May 30 '12 at 15:20
    
Debug the code step by step and check the values of each variable. You will realize that you are not storing the sums properly. Maybe you need to define another variable. –  Jav_Rock May 30 '12 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think this will do

     for(int i=0;i<block.rows;i++)
     {
         for(int j=0;j<block.cols;j++)
             {

              sum = sum + block.at<uchar>(i,j); //sums[k-1] + block.at<uchar>(i,j);
         }
     }
     sums[a]=sum;

Debug it to be sure. Without using sum it would be:

     for(int i=0;i<block.rows;i++)
     {
         for(int j=0;j<block.cols;j++)
             {

               sums[a] =  sums[a] + block.at<uchar>(i,j); //sums[k-1] + block.at<uchar>(i,j);
         }
     }         
share|improve this answer
    
when I tried this:- ' double sum= block.at<uchar>(0,0); for(int i=0;i<block.rows;i++){ for(int j=0;j<block.cols;j++){ sum= sum+block.at<uchar>(i,j); } sums[a]+=sum; } cout<<"sum of"<<a<<"is"<<sums[a]<<endl; ' the output was -6.27744e+066 Like · · Unfollow Post · about a minute ago –  Storm2012 May 30 '12 at 21:18

The row

sums[a] = sum + block.at(i,j);

looks strange. sums[a] has always the value of the last element of block. If this is by chance always 255, you have your explanation.

share|improve this answer
1  
In other words, you never set sum, so you're not actually summing anything. –  Peter May 30 '12 at 16:04

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