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I have this quite big CSV file (15 Gb) and I need to read about 1 million random lines from it. As far as I can see - and implement - the CSV utility in Python only allows to iterate sequentially in the file.

It's very memory consuming to read the all file into memory to use some random choosing and it's very time consuming to go trough all the file and discard some values and choose others, so, is there anyway to choose some random line from the CSV file and read only that line?

I tried without success:

   import csv

    with open('linear_e_LAN2A_F_0_435keV.csv') as file:
        reader = csv.reader(file)
        print reader[someRandomInteger]

A sample of the CSV file:

331.093,329.735 
251.188,249.994 
374.468,373.782 
295.643,295.159 
83.9058,0 
380.709,116.221 
352.238,351.891 
183.809,182.615 
257.277,201.302
61.4598,40.7106
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maybe duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/10605532/… –  VP. May 30 '12 at 15:59
2  
@VP I believe the solutions there required loading the entire file into memory. –  Andre Boos May 30 '12 at 16:01
    
@VP No, in that thread you read the all file into memory before choosing the random line and that's exactly what I need to avoid. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 16:01
    
What is the format of the file? Are all lines the same length? Are there literal commas in any of the lines? –  Andre Boos May 30 '12 at 16:05
    
@Andre All the lines have 2 decimal values separated by a comma. But the values may have more or less numbers. I updated the question with a sample of the file. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 16:09
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8 Answers

import random

filesize = 1500                 #size of the really big file
offset = random.randrange(filesize)

f = open('really_big_file')
f.seek(offset)                  #go to random position
f.readline()                    # discard - bound to be partial line
random_line = f.readline()      # bingo!

# extra to handle last/first line edge cases
if len(random_line) == 0:       # we have hit the end
    f.seek(0)
    random_line = f.readline()  # so we'll grab the first line instead

As @AndreBoos pointed out, this approach will lead to biased selection. If you know min and max length of line you can remove this bias by doing the following:

Let's assume (in this case) we have min=3 and max=15

1) Find the length (Lp) of the previous line.

Then if Lp = 3, the line is most biased against. Hence we should take it 100% of the time If Lp = 15, the line is most biased towards. We should only take it 20% of the time as it is 5* more likely selected.

We accomplish this by randomly keeping the line X% of the time where:

X = min / Lp

If we don't keep the line, we do another random pick until our dice roll comes good. :-)

share|improve this answer
2  
Clever, but this will provide biased results on files with variable-length lines. –  Andre Boos May 30 '12 at 16:04
4  
@thg435: That does not fix anything. A line after a long line will be disproportionately represented compared to one after a short line. Furthermore, the first line will never be read. –  Andre Boos May 30 '12 at 16:07
1  
+1 for fixing the last line bug before I could post a comment ;) –  StephenPaulger May 30 '12 at 16:14
2  
@MariaZverina I think that to make an unbiased selection you need to know not only the minimum length of the line, but also the frequency of each line length in the file. Anyway, in the file, the only values that have less than 7 characters are the 0. I will try to convert my file to have 0 replaced by 0.00000 and then your routine should work perfectly. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 17:44
1  
@MariaZverina ...Ok...I "did the math", and the probabilities do work out to be uniform using your second step filter. I stand corrected. (takes his hat off and bows to you) –  parselmouth May 30 '12 at 20:31
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I have this quite big CSV file (15 Gb) and I need to read about 1 million random lines from it

Assuming you don't need exactly 1 million lines and know then number of lines in your CSV file beforehand, you can use reservoir sampling to retrieve your random subset. Simply iterate through your data and for each line determine the chances of the line being selected. That way you only need a single pass of your data.

This works well if you need to extract the random samples often but the actual dataset changes infrequently (since you'll only need to keep track of the number of entries each time the dataset changes).

chances_selected = desired_num_results / total_entries
for line in csv.reader(file):
   if random() < chances_selected:
        result.append(line)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, reservoir sampling. But how do they find total_entries? –  thg435 May 30 '12 at 16:18
1  
@thg435 hence the statement "... and know the number of lines in your CSV file". Such a scheme works if you're doing the sampling often and you need only count the dataset size once. –  Shawn Chin May 30 '12 at 16:22
    
@thg435 And thanks for the proper term. I couldn't for the life of me recall it. –  Shawn Chin May 30 '12 at 16:23
    
aha, didn't notice that. BTW, if all lines are of similar length, you can estimate total_entries = filesize / length_of_first_line –  thg435 May 30 '12 at 16:29
1  
@AndreBoos no it won't. Not if you do it correctly anyway. –  Shawn Chin May 30 '12 at 16:37
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You can use a variation of the probabilistic method for choosing a random line in a file.

Instead of just keeping a single number that gets chosen, you can keep a buffer of size C. For each line number, n, in the file with N lines, you want to choose that line with probability C/n (rather than the original 1/n. If the number is selected, you then choose a random location from the C-length buffer to evict.

Here's how it works:

import random

C = 2
fpath = 'somelines.txt'
buffer = []

f = open(fpath, 'r')
for line_num, line in enumerate(f):
    n = line_num + 1.0
    r = random.random()
    if n <= C:
        buffer.append(line.strip())
    elif r < C/n:
        loc = random.randint(0, C-1)
        buffer[loc] = line.strip()

This requires a single pass through the file (so it's linear time) and returns exactly C lines from the file. Each line will have probability C/N of being selected.

To verify that the above works, I created a file with 5 lines containing a,b,c,d,e. I ran the code 10,000 times with C=2. This should produce about an even distribution of the 5 choose 2 (so 10) possible choices. The results:

a,b: 1046
b,c: 1018
b,e: 1014
a,c: 1003
c,d: 1002
d,e: 1000
c,e: 993
a,e: 992
a,d: 985
b,d: 947
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks. But that way you have to read the all file before and that takes a lot for this huge file. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 18:17
    
Congratulations for figuring out how to do it in one pass. –  Mark Ransom May 30 '12 at 18:22
    
@jbssm You have to read through the entire file at least once to get an unbiased result. –  jterrace May 30 '12 at 18:30
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Another solution is possible if you know the total number of lines - generate 1 million random numbers (random.sample(xrange(n), 1000000)) up to the total number of lines as a set, then use:

for i, line in enumerate(csvfile):
    if i in lines_to_grab:
        yield line

This will get you exactly 1 million lines in an unbiased way, but you need to have the number of lines beforehand.

share|improve this answer
    
But that way I still have to read the all file up to the line I actually want to read. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 16:43
    
@jbssm: You have to run through the entire file, yes, but you don't have to load it all into memory. –  Thomas K May 30 '12 at 16:46
    
Will work, but with the additional memory overheads of a million numbers. And you'll still need to make a pass through the data file. –  Shawn Chin May 30 '12 at 16:46
1  
Yep. That's about 30MB as a set on my computer, so it's probably not a deal breaker. –  Thomas K May 30 '12 at 16:51
    
Use random.sample to create lines_to_grab. –  Mark Ransom May 30 '12 at 18:30
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If the lines are truly .csv format and NOT fixed field, then no, there's not. You can crawl through the file once, indexing the byte offsets for each line, then when later needed only use the index set, but there's no way to a priori predict the exact location of the line-terminating \n character for arbitrary csv files.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid that this was the case, unless we know more about the possible values of each line. –  Andre Boos May 30 '12 at 16:09
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If you can place this data in a sqlite3 database, selecting some number of random rows is trivial. You will not need to pre-read or pad lines in the file. Since sqlite data files are binary, you data file will be 1/3 to 1/2 smaller than CSV text.

You can use a script like THIS to import the CSV file or, better still, just write your data to a database table in the first place. SQLITE3 is part of the Python distribution.

Then use these statements to get 1,000,000 random rows:

mydb='csv.db'
con=sqlite3.connect(mydb)

with con:
    cur=con.cursor()
    cur.execute("SELECT * FROM csv ORDER BY RANDOM() LIMIT 1000000;")

    for row in cur.fetchall():
        # now you have random rows...
share|improve this answer
    
Than you Drew, it seems the most advanced solution but unfortunately I won't be the only one using these numbers to do science and I'm really certain most of the other people will have no idea what is an sql database, much less how to use it. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 23:57
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You can rewrite the file with fixed-length records, and then perform random access on the intermediate file later:

ifile = file.open("inputfile.csv")
ofile = file.open("intermediatefile.csv",'w')
for line in ifile:
    ofile.write(line.rstrip('\n').ljust(15)+'\n')

Then, you can do:

import random
ifile = file.open("intermediatefile.csv")
lines = []
samples = random.sample(range(nlines))
for sample in samples:
    ifile.seek(sample)
    lines.append(ifile.readline())

Requires more disk space, and the first program may take some time to run, but it allows unlimited later random access to records with the second.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand your point and it looks valid, but the conversion routine you gave me doesn't work. Looking at my file, all values have 7 chars (counting the .), except for the 0 values. So I actually only need to transform the 0 into 0.00000 and it should work. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 17:41
    
Oh, I see; that makes sense. Do you have any control over the program that outputs that data? It's probably possible to change the output format to something more regular. –  Andre Boos May 30 '12 at 18:02
    
I do, but it's written in C++ and after much searching I realized there is no way to do that with printf for every value. So I will have to do the conversion in python probably. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 18:15
    
It should be doable try somethine like: "%09.4f" % (1/3.0) .... That will give your four fixed decimal points ... and will not wrap for any number under 10000.0 –  Maria Zverina May 30 '12 at 20:12
    
@jbssm also consider exponential format: "%.4e" % (1/3.0) this will give you five significant digits and fixed width of 10 chars. Unless you need to format negative numbers as well .... in which case use the + modifier for printf. And reading exponential formated floats is just as easy as basic floats in python. –  Maria Zverina May 30 '12 at 20:18
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# pass 1, count the number of rows in the file
rowcount = sum(1 for line in file)
# pass 2, select random lines
file.seek(0)
remaining = 1000000
for row in csv.reader(file):
    if random.randrange(rowcount) < remaining:
        print row
        remaining -= 1
    rowcount -= 1
share|improve this answer
    
You still have to iterate over each line this way to get to a line your random variable tells you to read. After thinking a bit more about it, the only way possible without iterating trough the all file, is by using Maria Zverina method and making sure all line have and equal number of chars. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 18:22
    
@jbssm, if each line has an equal number of characters this becomes trivial - just multiply the random line number times the line size, and seek to that point in the file. –  Mark Ransom May 30 '12 at 18:24
    
Yes, I will write some file conversion program and then use that way then. Thanks. –  jbssm May 30 '12 at 18:25
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