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I'm trying to generate dynamic var names in a shell script to process a set of files with distinct names in a loop as follows:

#!/bin/bash

SAMPLE1='1-first.with.custom.name'
SAMPLE2='2-second.with.custom.name'

for (( i = 1; i <= 2; i++ ))
do
  echo SAMPLE{$i}
done

I would expect the output:

1-first.with.custom.name
2-second.with.custom.name

but i got:

SAMPLE{1}
SAMPLE{2}

Is it possible generate var names in the fly?

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2  
Why don't you use an array? See BashFAQ/006. –  Dennis Williamson May 30 '12 at 17:56
    
@DennisWilliamson Mainly because that was the first idea coming to my mind and needed quickly do a test. –  pQB May 31 '12 at 7:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

slight change

SAMPLE1='1-first.with.custom.name'
SAMPLE2='2-second.with.custom.name'

for (( i = 1; i <= 2; i++ ))
do
   var="SAMPLE$i"
   echo ${!var}
done
share|improve this answer
    
what shell is that? –  mpapis May 30 '12 at 16:37
    
This actually works in bash, nice! @johnshen64, where did you learn this from? What is it called in the man page? –  Miquel May 30 '12 at 16:40
3  
Take a look at Parameter Expansion in the Bash man page. For ${parameter}: "If the first character of parameter is an exclamation point (!), a level of variable indirection is introduced. Bash uses the value of the variable formed from the rest of parameter as the name of the variable; this variable is then expanded and that value is used in the rest of the substitution, rather than the value of parameter itself. This is known as indirect expansion." –  dogbane May 30 '12 at 16:47
1  
Brilliant, thanks a lot for the reference. I'd say this is the best answer. –  Miquel May 30 '12 at 16:49
    
thanks dogbane for the detailed explanation. Really good to know. I just use it and never bothered to know what it was called :-) –  johnshen64 May 30 '12 at 17:02

The Problem

You're using the value of i as if it were an array index. It isn't, because SAMPLE1 and SAMPLE2 are separate variables, not an array.

In addition, when calling echo SAMPLE{$i} you are only appending the value of i to the word "SAMPLE." The only variable you are dereferencing in this statement is $i, which is why you got the results you did.

Ways to Address the Problem

There are two main ways to address this:

  1. Multi-stage dereferencing of an interpolated variable, via the eval builtin or indirect variable expansion.
  2. Iterating over an array, or using i as an index into an array.

Dereferencing with eval

The easiest thing to do in this situation is to use eval:

SAMPLE1='1-first.with.custom.name'
SAMPLE2='2-second.with.custom.name'

for (( i = 1; i <= 2; i++ )); do
    eval echo \$SAMPLE${i}
done

This will append the value of i to the end of the variable, and then reprocess the resulting line, expanding the interpolated variable name (e.g. SAMPLE1 or SAMPLE2).

Dereferencing with Indirect Variables

The accepted answer for this question is:

SAMPLE1='1-first.with.custom.name'
SAMPLE2='2-second.with.custom.name'

for (( i = 1; i <= 2; i++ ))
do
   var="SAMPLE$i"
   echo ${!var}
done

This is technically a three-step process. First, it assigns an interpolated variable name to var, then dereferences the variable name stored in var, and finally expands the result. It looks a little cleaner, and some people are more comfortable with this syntax than with eval, but the result is largely the same.

Iterating Over an Array

You can simplify both the loop and the expansion by iterating over an array instead of using variable interpolation. For example:

SAMPLE=('1-first.with.custom.name' '2-second.with.custom.name')
for i in "${SAMPLE[@]}"; do
    echo "$i"
done

This has added benefits over the other methods. Specifically:

  1. You don't need to specify a complex loop test.
  2. You access individual array elements via the $SAMPLE[$i] syntax.
  3. You can get the total number of elements with the ${#SAMPLE} variable expansion.

Practical Equivalency for Original Example

All three methods will work for the example given in the original question, but the array solution provides the most overall flexibility. Choose whichever one works best for the data you have on hand.

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1  
-1 for using eval where unnecessary. –  chepner May 30 '12 at 16:56
    
Agree with chepner -- this is otherwise a great answer, but the example using eval should, if kept in, have a warning to avoid such usage. It might also be worth adding an example of bash 4's associative arrays, if comprehensiveness is a goal. –  Charles Duffy May 30 '12 at 19:21
1  
Please feel free to point out how eval differs from indirect variables for this use case if you feel that strongly about it. However, a lot of people avoid eval reflexively, even when it's the right tool for the job--and if you can trust your input source, you can trust eval. Adding a disclaimer to every post about the potential evils of eval is a bit like those ubiquitous labels saying "Warning: This coffee may be hot." –  CodeGnome May 30 '12 at 19:55
1  
I've removed my downvote. I think that using eval is overkill when indirect variable expansion is available. Both are inferior solutions, though, as they simply mimic array indexing, which is already available. –  chepner May 30 '12 at 21:16
    
@chepner +1 for array indexing. I certainly agree that it is the best solution, and I even highlighted the reasons why I think so in the answer that I gave. –  CodeGnome May 30 '12 at 21:55

You can use eval as shown below:

SAMPLE1='1-first.with.custom.name'
SAMPLE2='2-second.with.custom.name'

for (( i = 1; i <= 2; i++ ))
do
  eval echo \$SAMPLE$i
done
share|improve this answer
    
Eval introduces security issues which an associative array or indirect variable will not. See mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/048 –  Charles Duffy May 30 '12 at 19:19

Not as far as I know, They way @johnshen64 said. Also, you could solve your problem using an array like so:

SAMPLE[1]='1-first.with.custom.name'
SAMPLE[2]='2-second.with.custom.name'

for (( i = 1; i <= 2; i++ )) do
    echo ${SAMPLE[$i]}
done

Note that you don't need to use numbers as indexes SAMPLE[hello] will work just as well

share|improve this answer
    
Good point but I already had the bunch of SAMPLE# created :) –  pQB May 30 '12 at 16:47
1  
This is not an associative array, rather a regular array. Associative arrays use arbitrary strings as the index. –  chepner May 30 '12 at 16:57
    
Or you could do the assignment like this (zero-based): SAMPLE=('1-first.with.custom.name' '2-second.with.custom.name') or one-based: SAMPLE=([1]='1-first.with.custom.name' '2-second.with.custom.name'). You can break the assignment into multiple lines if you want. –  Dennis Williamson May 30 '12 at 17:55
    
@chepner you're right; fixed –  Miquel May 30 '12 at 20:32

Not a standalone answer, just an addition to Miquel's answer which I couldn't fit well in a comment.

You can populate the array using a loop, the += operator, and a here document as well:

SAMPLE=()
while read; do SAMPLE+=("$REPLY"); done <<EOF
1-first.with.custom.name
2-second.with.custom.name
EOF

In bash 4.0, it's as simple as

readarray SAMPLE <<EOF
1-first.with.custom.name
2-second.with.custom.name
EOF
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