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How to call protected constructor in c#?

I searched for a solution of my problem.
Actually I don't know if it is possible or not. Please help me.

namespace namespace1
{
    namespace namespace1a
    {
        public class classa
        {
            protected classa(string i) //protected constructor
            {
                //Do something
            }
            public classa() //public constructor
            {
                //Do something
            }

        }
    }

    namespace namespace1b
    {
        public class classb
        {
            classa i = new classa(); // calls public constructor of classa

            classa j = new classa("hi"); //Invalid. How to call the protected constructor of classa
        }
    }
}  

I want to call the protected constructor of "classa" from "classb", How to do that? Please help me.

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marked as duplicate by cadrell0, Kirk Woll, Krishanu Dey, Perception, Joe May 31 '12 at 13:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Only possible if classb derives from classa. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bcd5672a%28v=vs.80%29.aspx –  Tim Schmelter May 30 '12 at 16:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If

  • classa and classb are in the same assembly
  • You are authoring both class
  • You are trying to protect classa's constructor.

then you can declare the constructor as protected internal instead.

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You can use reflection to get a reference to the constructor you want to invoke from the type's metadata:

var ctor = typeof(classa).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance, null, new[] { typeof(string) }, null);

Once you have a reference to the constructor you can invoke it, passing in the arguments you want to give the constructor as an array of objects:

var instance = (classa)ctor.Invoke(new object[] { "Chicken butt" });

That being said, the constructor is probably protected for a reason and using reflection to circumvent encapsulation of a type's members is generally not a good idea.

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It is not possible unless classb derives from classa. Protected makes the constructor visible only to the class itself and every class that derives from classa.

Take a look here: Protected C#

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Your question is a duplicate of this one.
except for deriving from classa, reflection is a usefull option (by quering the constructors of the tpye, and then running the suitable one, as explained in one of the answers in the link provided)

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A safe way to do this would be to add a proxy class that inherits from classb with a public constructor taking a string. The protected contract is well-defined.

class bproxy : classb
{
     public bproxy(string x) : base(x) {...}
}

An alternative is to use reflection. Quite honestly I don't recommend doing this because when an author sets a constructor as protected, it's intended to only be used by itself and derived classes. You are also tightly coupled to a "contract" that is not explicitly defined.

That being said, this should work for you though it will break as soon as the author changes the non-guaranteed part of the contract (USE AT YOUR OWN RISK):

var constructor = typeof(classa).GetConstructors(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
var b = constructor.First().Invoke(new object[] {"hi"});
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for giving OP a big red button and then telling him not to press it. –  Servy May 30 '12 at 17:19
    
@Servy Giving warnings when showing how to do something dangerous is a bad idea? –  cadrell0 May 30 '12 at 17:24
    
@cadrell0 No, it would be better to not show someone how to do something dangerous in the first place as opposed to saying, "you need to inherit from the class to use that constructor" and ignoring any hacks to access it anyway. –  Servy May 30 '12 at 17:27

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