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I've been playing around with LINQ to SQL and I just have a couple of simple questions:

  • When do I need Select on the end of my query?
  • When can I omit the Select?

Here are my example queries:

Dim pageRoute = From r In db.PageRoutes Where r.PageId = pageId Order By r.Id Descending

Dim pageRoute = From r In db.PageRoutes Where r.PageId = pageId Order By r.Id Descending

Dim dp = From r In db.DownloadPageOnlineOnlies Where r.PageId = pageId Order By r.Weight Descending, r.Id Ascending

Dim download = (From r In db.Downloads Where r.Id = id).First
  • Are any of them technically wrong?
  • Could they be improved with a Select or something else?

In a nutshell, I don't understand when I would need either:

Select r
Select r.AColumnINeed, r.BColumnINeed (does this improve performance?)

Thanks.

P.S. I like to write my LINQ queries on one line unless they are really big.

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1  
Isn't the Select always optional in VB.NET? stackoverflow.com/a/6515130/284240 –  Tim Schmelter May 30 '12 at 16:56
    
I don't know that's why I'm asking. If something is optional then I usually leave it out just to give my fingers a rest! –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 16:57
    
In stackoverflow.com/questions/6515037/… what does it mean by "select what is current"? –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 17:15
1  
If you don't specify a select, all is selected. Dim q = From r In tbl.AsEnumerable From c In tbl.Columns.Cast(Of DataColumn)() returns an anonymous type with a cartesian product of all DataRows and all DataColumns in that DataTable. Always prefer readability, so use Select whenever it's unclear what the query returns. –  Tim Schmelter May 30 '12 at 17:23
    
Ok so the query would be along the lines of Dim q = From r In tbl.AsEnumerable From c In tbl.Columns.Cast(Of DataColumn)() Select r.Column1, c.Column2 ? –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 17:34
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's have a table with 20 columns. Take a query WITH select (2 columns) and one WITHOUT. The execution plan of the two can be different and there's much less data to transfer from the database server in the former case.

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Okay I understand that but, do I need to Select r if I want all columns e.g. SELECT * in T-SQL? –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 16:59
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I am not sure about vb syntax but this should be optional and would be eliminated as an identity projection by the linq expression visitor. –  Wiktor Zychla May 30 '12 at 17:42
    
So if I put Select at the end and it is not needed, it will be removed anyway? Is that during compilation or execution? –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 17:44
    
During execution, when expression visitor translates linq to sql. –  Wiktor Zychla May 30 '12 at 18:20
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The select portion of the linq statement is completely optional if and only if you want to get a full object out of the collection that matches your where clause. If you want individual value(s) from an object in the collection being LINQ'd through then you need to use a select clause.

I personally always put the select r clause on the end just out of pure habit but I have come across a few issues with other peoples code when I have option strict on and they did not when they wrote the LINQ. Leaving the select clause off yields multiple late binding errors if you decide to turn option strict on in the future for whatever reason.

so in short you don't need the select clause but you are only helping yourself later on down the line if you decide to turn option strict on. And it does make your code much more readable in my opinion.

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Thanks for the tips. I will consider this for my next project :) –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 19:04
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it a good practice to use select plus if you have a query that requests a more precise result and like you only want a or a and b from you query you might use select and it saves the memory allocation for your query since it know exact number of variables you are going to return.

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But why is it best practice? I usually favour consistency and less code over best practice! –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 17:02
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Using less code is not always means it gives the best performance –  COLD TOLD May 30 '12 at 17:03
    
I just like to cut the fat in the code to make it easier to read, debug and maintain. –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 17:09
    
so you willing to give up performance for that –  COLD TOLD May 30 '12 at 17:10
    
Well I'm not worried about it taking a few extra milliseconds to execute. –  Chris Cannon May 30 '12 at 17:13
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