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Given the following example:

class BaseClass
{
  BaseClass()
  {
  };

  virtual ~BaseClass()
  {
    this->Cleanup();
  };

  virtual void Cleanup()
  {
    // Do cleanup here.
  };
};

class Level1DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
  Level1DerivedClass()
  {
  };

  virtual ~Level1DerivedClass()
  {
  };

  virtual void Cleanup()
  {
    // Call my base cleanup.
    BaseClass::Cleanup();

    // Do additional cleanup here.
  };
};

class Level2DerivedClass : public Level1DerivedClass
{
  Level2DerivedClass()
  {
  };

  ~Level2DerivedClass()
  {
  };

  void Cleanup()
  {
    // Call my base cleanup.
    Level1DerivedClass::Cleanup();

    // Do additional cleanup here.
  };  
};


main()
{
  Level2DerivedClass * derived2 = new Level2DerivedClass();
  delete derived2;
  return 0;
}

When I delete my derived class reference, I would EXPECT the flow would be as follows:

  1. Level2DerivedClass destructor is executed.
  2. Because Level1DerivedClass destructor is virtual, it would be executed.
  3. Because BaseClass destructor is virtual, it would be executed.
  4. Because BaseClass::Cleanup and Level1DerivedClass::Cleanup are both virtual, the call from the BaseClass 'this' pointer in the BaseClass destructor would executed the implementation of the most derived class - Level2DerivedClass::Cleanup.
  5. Level2DerivedClass::Cleanup calls its parent's Cleanup implementation.
  6. Level1DerivedClass::Cleanup calls its parent's Cleanup implementation.

What is happening is that it is calling the destructors for each level of inheritance (1 - 3) above the way I'm expecting. But when this->Cleanup() is called from the BaseClass destructor, it only executes its own implementation. I don't understand why this is happening because normally when you instantiate a derived class pointer, cast it as a base class pointer, and call a virtual method from the base class pointer (in this case, 'this'), it still runs the derived class implementation (the whole point of 'virtual', yes?). In my example, Level2DerivedClass::Cleanup and Level1DerivedClass::Cleanup never gets called.

The reason I'm setting it up this way is I want to be able to call my Cleanup code without having to destroy my object, which is why I'm abstracting it from the actual destructor body.

If you have suggestions on a more proper way to do this, I'm all ears. But I would also like an explanation of why my setup doesn't work - what am I misunderstanding?

Thank you in advance for your time.

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Does this compile? error: 'BaseClass::BaseClass()' is private –  Alessandro Pezzato May 30 '12 at 17:14
    
Alessandro, sorry. This is not real code, just an example representing what I'm trying to do in my program. –  Tim Coolman May 30 '12 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The rule of thumb is: Never Call Virtual Functions during Construction or Destruction.

They don't behave as you might expect; as each destructor finishes, the dynamic type of this is effectively modified. From [class.cdtor] in the C++ standard:

When a virtual function is called directly or indirectly from a constructor (including the mem-initializer or brace-or-equal-initializer for a non-static data member) or from a destructor, and the object to which the call applies is the object under construction or destruction, the function called is the one defined in the constructor or destructor’s own class or in one of its bases, but not a function overriding it in a class derived from the constructor or destructor’s class, or overriding it in one of the other base classes of the most derived object.

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You can call virtual functions, you just need to know what will happen... –  n.m. May 30 '12 at 17:17
    
Thanks, Oli! That is what I was missing. Thanks much for the explanation. So a possible solution would be to put a NON-virtual Cleanup() method in each class, and call it from each class's own destructor. The virtual destructors would still make sure that all destructors are called - the Cleanup() just wouldn't be handled by virtual implementation like I have now. Sound right? –  Tim Coolman May 30 '12 at 18:31

The Proper Way Of Doing Things is: clean after yourself, and yourself only, in the destructor. Don't clean after your kids or your parents.

If you want to clean up things not from the destructor, You Are Doing It Wrong. In C++ we have this little thing called RAII, Resource Acquisition Is Initialization. But there's also its dual, which does not seem to have an officially sounding name, but here's something that could work: RDID, Resource Disposal Is Destruction.

Of course you don't have to adhere to the RAII/RDID philosophy, but that would be Not The C++ Way.

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Thanks n.m. I'm always learning new things about C++, and this isn't one I'd encountered before. Good tips on best practices. –  Tim Coolman May 30 '12 at 18:33

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