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Suppose I'm in a template and I want to know if a type parameter T is an instantiation of a particular template, e.g., std::shared_ptr:

template<typename T>
void f(T&& param)
{
    if (instantiation_of(T, std::shared_ptr)) ...   // if T is an instantiation of 
                                                    // std::shared_ptr...
  ...
}

More likely I'd want to do this kind of test as part of a std::enable_if test:

template<typename T>
std::enable_if<instantiation_of<T, std::shared_ptr>::type
f(T&& param) 
{
    ...
}

// other overloads of f for when T is not an instantiation of std::shared_ptr

Is there a way to do this? Note that the solution needs to work with all possible types and templates, including those in the standard library and in other libraries I cannot modify. My use of std::shared_ptr above is just an example of what I might want to do.

If this is possible, how would I write the test myself, i.e., implement instantiation_of?

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7  
Totally unrelated: the more pedantically correct name for instantiation_of is specialization_of. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 30 '12 at 17:44
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes - so typedef std::shared_ptr<int> IntPtr is a specialization? –  Useless May 30 '12 at 17:53
    
Yes, I know, but I was afraid that using that terminology would have confused more than clarified. I apologize if my fear was the the truly confusing factor. –  KnowItAllWannabe May 30 '12 at 17:54
2  
@Useless yes. Informally, we often use "instantiation" to mean "specialization" and "specialization" to mean "explicit specialization", but technically, both are specializations. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 30 '12 at 17:58
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: And the whole issue is further confounded because "explicit instantiation" is yet another thing that exists. –  Kerrek SB May 30 '12 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A partial spec should be able to do it.

template<template<typename...> class X, typename T> struct instantiation_of : public std::false_type {};
template<template<typename...> class X, typename... Y> struct instantiation_of<X, X<Y...>> : public std::true_type {};

http://ideone.com/4n346

I actually had to look up the template template syntax, because I've basically never had cause to use it before.

Not sure how this interacts with templates like std::vector with additional defaulted arguments.

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Just use template <typename...> class X as your first argument and typename ...Y as your second. –  Kerrek SB May 30 '12 at 17:54
1  
@Kerrek: Thanks! I've no skill in variadic templates as MSVC does not support. –  Puppy May 30 '12 at 17:55
    
(And then it's X<Y...> -- sorry.) –  Kerrek SB May 30 '12 at 17:55
1  
(To explain: If you pass T = std::vector<int>, and X = std::vector, then Y is deduced as the pack { int, std::allocator<int> }). –  Kerrek SB May 30 '12 at 18:02
    
@DeadMG: I don't think this works, because I don't want to pass in the template arguments in the true case, I just want to pass in the type. For example, If I have MySet as a typedef for std::set<int, mycomparitor, myallocator>, I want to get true from is_instantiation<set, MySet>. [Kindly pardon the lousy formatting. I can't figure out how to get code in a comment. This is my first experience with SO.] –  KnowItAllWannabe May 30 '12 at 18:07

Why use enable_if when simple overloading suffices?

template<typename T>
void f(std::shared_ptr<T> param) 
{
    // ...
}

If you really do need such a trait, I think this should get you started (only roughly tested with VC++ 2010):

#include <type_traits>

template<typename>
struct template_arg;

template<template<typename> class T, typename U>
struct template_arg<T<U>>
{
    typedef U type;
};

template<typename T>
struct is_template
{
    static T* make();

    template<typename U>
    static std::true_type check(U*, typename template_arg<U>::type* = nullptr);
    static std::false_type check(...);

    static bool const value =
        std::is_same<std::true_type, decltype(check(make()))>::value;
};

template<
    typename T,
    template<typename> class,
    bool Enable = is_template<T>::value
>
struct specialization_of : std::false_type
{ };

template<typename T, template<typename> class U>
struct specialization_of<T, U, true> :
    std::is_same<T, U<typename template_arg<T>::type>>
{ };
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have declared the function parameter to be of type T&& to clarify that I wanted to be able to perfect-forward the parameter. I've edited the original post to show this. With this constraint in place, overloading is not an option. –  KnowItAllWannabe May 30 '12 at 17:53
    
@user1426649: I don't see how perfect-forwarding invalidates this answer. –  Mooing Duck May 30 '12 at 17:58
    
@MooingDuck: The only parameters that can be perfect-forwarded are of type T&&. Types like std::shared_ptr<T>&& don't qualify. –  KnowItAllWannabe May 30 '12 at 18:13
    
@Mooing Duck: Because if you have a function that accepts 'shared_ptr<T>&&', it cannot bind to an lvalue, where as 'T&&' can , because the way it decomposes during template argument deduction. –  Dave S May 30 '12 at 18:14
    
@user1426649 : Edited for a non-variadic approach. –  ildjarn May 30 '12 at 18:14

Best way to do it when dealing with a T&& is to make sure you remove_reference before doing the check, because the underlying type T can be a reference or a value type, and template partial specialization has to be exact to work. Combined with an answer above the code to do it could be:

template <
  typename T,
  template <typename...> class Templated
> struct has_template_type_impl : std::false_type {};

template <
  template <typename...> class T,
  typename... Ts
> struct has_template_type_impl<T<Ts...>, T> : std::true_type {};

template <
  typename T, 
  template <typename...> class Templated
> using has_template_type = has_template_type_impl<
    typename std::remove_reference<T>::type,
    Templated
>;

And then you just enable_if your way to victory:

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<has_template_type<T, std::shared_ptr>::value>::type
f(T&& param)
{
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works really nicely, thanks for the code! –  KnowItAllWannabe May 30 '12 at 21:48
    
No problem, glad I could be of some help ;) –  bstamour May 31 '12 at 3:22

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