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I have a parent div (main) with the horizontal overflow set to auto. I then have a child element (columns) that has all of my column properties on it. The problem is that once the content goes further than the viewport I can no longer control the right hand margins or padding as the column only seems to go as far as the viewport. For example when I put a background color on "columns" the background only goes as far as the edge of the viewport even though the content scrolls further than that.

.main {
    overflow-x: visible;
    overflow-y: hidden;
    width: 100%;
}
.columns {
    background: red;
    column-fill: auto;
    column-width: 670px;
    column-gap: 80px;
    height: 120px;
    padding: 20px;
    width: auto;
}

<div class="main">
     <div class="columns">
           <p></p>
           <p></p>
           <p></p>
           <p></p>
           <p></p>
     </div>
</div>

Here is an example: http://jsfiddle.net/fyG24/

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Welcome to Stack Overflow! I hope my answer proves useful. Don't forget, if my answer is useful, upvote it. If it solves your issue, click the check mark to "accept" it. –  ScottS May 30 '12 at 18:53
    
And, don't forget, you can upvote as many answers as you want, but you can only accept one. Both actions increase the person's reputation. –  Jeremy Goodell May 30 '12 at 18:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

New Answer: Use Pseudo-Elements to Help

Based on your comments, here is new the fiddle that I believe meets your desires. It adds an extra div wrapping .columns I labeled .scroller, and the following css:

html {
    height: 100%;
}

body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    height: 100%;    
}
.main {
    background: yellow;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: relative;
}

.main:after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    left: 0;
    height: 120px; /* match columns */
    background: red;
    z-index: 0;
}

.scroller {
    overflow-y: hidden;
    overflow-x: auto;
    height: 100%;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 1;
}


.columns {
    -webkit-column-fill: auto;
    -webkit-column-width: 300px;
    -webkit-column-gap: 40px;
    -moz-column-fill: auto;
    -moz-column-width: 300px;
    -moz-column-gap: 40px;
    height: 120px;
    padding: 0 20px;
    text-align: justify;
    width: auto;
}


.columns > p:last-of-type:after {
    content: '';
    display: block;
    width: 20px;
    height: 1px;
    float: right;
    margin-right: -20px;
    margin-top: -1px;
}

I use a pseudo-element in .main to give the background for .columns set to the explicit height you intend for those, then I also use another pseudo-element in the last p to force rendering the final 20px of the column. It should work no matter how long or what part it takes up, and at height: 1px and margin-top: -1px it should not generate a new column if it falls right at the end of a column of text.

Original Answer: Move Overflow and Set a Right Margin

To get the background to transfer, you need to change some CSS, namely:

.main {
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 100%;
}

.columns {
    overflow-x: auto;
}

This seems to be because the .column background is being limited by the 100% width on the .main which is in control of the horizontal scroll bar in your original code. By making .main purely hidden, then setting overflow-x: auto on .columns, the scroll is now controlled by the .columns div, and allows its background to be seen.

To fix the absence of padding on the far right side, the only think I could come up with was to add the following:

.columns > p:last-of-type {
    margin-right: 20px;
}

This puts a right margin on the last p element of the immediate children of .columns which then gave the look I assume you are going for.

Here's the fiddle modified (tested only in Firefox).

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I should have been more specific in my example. I can't add the overflow to columns because its not always as tall as the viewport and I need scroll bar to always be on the bottom. Depending on screen resolution I am displaying different amounts of content that need to be contained which is why I have the extra parent with the overflow set to it. Also I cant put the padding on the last p because its not always just one p tall. The last column could potentially have more than one p in it. –  Drastick May 30 '12 at 19:04
    
@Mike--is all your potential content contained withing .columns or is some just inside .main or even outside .main? –  ScottS May 30 '12 at 19:11
    
yes, all of the content is contained within .columns. I however don't always want the content to take up the entire height of the viewport based on my current grid size at a certain resolution. So I have a fixed height set on .columns which prevents me from being able to attach the scrollbar to the bottom of the viewport. –  Drastick May 30 '12 at 19:14
    
@Mike--okay, I updated with a new answer that I think meets your desires. –  ScottS May 30 '12 at 19:49
    
I really only needed the last bit and I modified it a little (didn't need width or display) and added it to .columns:after and not p:after and it seems to work fine. It's a weird thing to do in order to add some padding but it works. Thanks. .columns:after { content: ''; height: 1px; float: right; margin-right: -120px; margin-top: -1px; } –  Drastick May 30 '12 at 20:12

I achieved better results just by dividing up your columns css as follows:

.columns {
    -webkit-column-fill: auto;
    -webkit-column-width: 300px;
    -webkit-column-gap: 40px;
    -moz-column-fill: auto;
    -moz-column-width: 300px;
    -moz-column-gap: 40px;
    height: 120px;
}
.columns p {
    background: red;
    height: 120px;
    padding: 0 20px;
    text-align: justify;
    width: auto;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This adds the padding to every p tag which in turn makes each column gap wider. I also can't just add it to the last p tag because its not always just one paragraph tall like it is in the example. –  Drastick May 30 '12 at 19:01

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