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Is the stack allocated at runtime or compile time?
Example:

void main()
{
    int x;
    scanf("%d", &x);
    int arr[x];
}
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What is you target platform ? –  user957902 May 30 '12 at 18:35
2  
The existence of recursion tells me that stack must be allocated at runtime. –  Blastfurnace May 30 '12 at 18:37
    
@user957902, How does target platform matter here? –  Jay May 30 '12 at 18:47
2  
Some implementations of C, for example C for low end Pic microctrollers, dont have a stack. C is a high level langauge, what it is compiled into is important. That is going to depend on platform. –  user957902 May 30 '12 at 18:52
    
Rule of thumb: all memory allocation is always done at runtime. Reason -- at the time the code is compiled, the machine that it's going to run on might not even have been constructed yet. How would the compiler allocate memory on a machine that doesn't exist? Some counter-examples can get a bit earlier than runtime, for example perhaps memory could be "allocated" at the time that an image is written to a device. –  Steve Jessop May 30 '12 at 19:54

8 Answers 8

Check out this great article

http://duartes.org/gustavo/blog/post/anatomy-of-a-program-in-memory

This is a great write up which explains about the program memory. You can also check other articles by the same author regarding memory behavior in s system which will give you a great insight into the actual working in memory.

if you want to know everything about memory try reading this paper by Ulrich Draper http://www.akkadia.org/drepper/cpumemory.pdf

hope this helps!

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To complement all the other answers (which are correct in the general case), it is sometimes possible, in theory, to allocate stack at compile-time (depending on your definition of "allocate").

Specifically, if your program has no function pointers or recursion, then one can use static analysis to figure out the maximum stack size required. Indeed, some embedded compilers do precisely that.

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+1 This is exactly what happens in embedded systems –  dolan May 30 '12 at 21:00

Ofcourse stack is allocated at run time. You need stack memory for executing the code.ec

Check this link which discusses the memory layout of a C program.

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It must be allocated at run time. Consider the following:

void a( void )
{
    int x;
}

void b( void )
{
    int y;
    a();
}

int main( void )
{
    a();
    b();
}

The address of the stack-local x in a() will be different between its two invocations. As blinkenlights points out, the layout of each function's stack frame is largely determined at compile time, but the placement of that frame is determined at run time.

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+1 -- good visualization –  Phillip Schmidt Jun 4 '12 at 22:01

This should help. Stack memory is allocated at runtime.

Keep in mind that it has to be allocated at runtime, as there is no way for the compiler to know how many times a function is called, or how many times a while loop is executed, or whatever.

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how would you allocate compile time? if I compile the code on my machine but execute it on yours how would the compiler be able to preallocate the memory for the stack on your machine?

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1  
I guess it depends on your definition of "allocate". It would certainly be possible for the program to be hardcoded to use a specific region of the virtual address space, for example. –  Oli Charlesworth May 30 '12 at 18:49
    
@OliCharlesworth and how would you have the compiler ensure that region would actually fit in memory? I've worked on a MCU where the memory was counted in bytes and I have multi figure Gb in the machines at work. something that would fit on those machines would have muc chance on the mentioned MCU –  Rune FS May 30 '12 at 18:53
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Would it need to ensure it will fit ? With runtime allocation, it usually doesn't make sure there's enough memory either, the program just crashes spectacularly if it runs out of memory for the stack. aka. a stackoverflow. –  nos May 30 '12 at 19:29
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@RuneFS: I'm not saying that it's always possible, merely that it's not never possible. –  Oli Charlesworth May 30 '12 at 19:44

Stack is allocated at runtime; layout of each stack frame, however, is decided at compile time, except for variable-size arrays.

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In addition to the layout, it is the stack base address that is decided before the program runs. It can be during compile time in some embedded or low-level application, or an address generated by the OS while transferring control to the CRT. –  ysap May 30 '12 at 18:47
    
just for documentation, this is a link that explain the 'stack frame' term.... –  cacho May 30 '12 at 19:00

Stack is always allocated at runtime, you need stack for method execution not for compilation.

On Similar Lines

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