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I have a "Page" that implement my own "Permission" interface.

public interface PagePermissions{
      Dictionary<string, Permission> readPermissions();
}


public partial class myWebPage: System.Web.UI.Page, PagePermissions
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }
     Dictionary<string, Permission> PagePermissions.readPermissions()
    {
        Dictionary<string, Permission> results = new Dictionary<string, Permission>();
        return results;
    }
}

In my master page, I get a reference to the current Page object.

  Page myPage = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

But I can't call my function ReadPermission because it's not recognizing it:

  myPage.readPermissions();

How do I call my implemented function?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to cast myPage to PagePermissions.

PagePermissions myPage = HttpContext.Current.Handler as PagePermissions;
myPage.readPermissions();
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k, I'll accept in 9 min. –  Yongke Bill Yu May 30 '12 at 19:14
    
@YongkeBillYu Thanks! –  Wesley Wiser May 30 '12 at 19:15

Try casting myPage to your interface.

PagePermissions myPagePermissions = (PagePermissions)myPage;
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Why are you using explicit implementation of the interface function? Think about changing the code line

Dictionary<string, Permission> PagePermissions.readPermissions()
{

to

public Dictionary<string, Permission> readPermissions()
{
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It will still need to be cast to his interface, PagePermissions to access the members--so there's no real difference. –  STW May 30 '12 at 19:30
    
Wrong. Implicitly implemented interface methods are part of the class's public interface. No need to cast in order to call the function then. –  Wormbo May 30 '12 at 19:32

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