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max('str','frt',key=len)

The max function returns only one of the string.
How can i make it return both of the strings?
The length of both strings is equal so max should return both the strings butit return only one so is there a way to return all max items.

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1  
What do you mean? Your question is confusing. Can you give a better example, and show what output you want? –  Mark Byers May 30 '12 at 19:51
2  
This might be relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/9853302/… –  abought May 30 '12 at 19:52
    
You probably can't, you have to write your own function. –  Felix Kling May 30 '12 at 19:52
    
'str' > 'frt', so why would you expect both values? –  Karl Knechtel May 30 '12 at 20:03
    
@KarlKnechtel len('str') == len('frt') –  gabber12 May 30 '12 at 20:10

3 Answers 3

You can write this as a list comprehension:

data = ['str', 'frt']
maxlen = max(map(len, data))
result = [s for s in data if len(s) == maxlen]
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Note: it's crucial that maxlen is calculated outside of the list comprehension (and hence only called once). –  Andy Hayden Oct 30 '13 at 22:27
    
Also, more pythonic (and slightly faster) to use max(a, key=len) in the second line, rather than max.map. –  Andy Hayden Oct 30 '13 at 22:31

By definition, the max function returns the maximum value. It doesn't return the item, just the value which is unique (even if there are multiple item with the same max value). I suggest you use a sort algorithm and take whatever values you need.

In your example:

data = ['str','frt']
sorted(data,key=len, reverse=True)
result = [s for s in data if len(s)==len(data[0])]
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sorting would take more time then max i think –  gabber12 May 30 '12 at 20:08
    
Not much. In term of complexity, sorting is pseudo-linear where max is linear which is more or less equivalent. And once sorted, there are lots of cool things you can do on your data like find the second max, the min, binary search.... It depends on your needs of course. –  Samy Arous May 30 '12 at 20:16
    
I added some timeit information, as suggested above sorting is significantly slower for large datasets. I don't understand what sorting achieves here over using max... You seem to be using it as a less efficient max, so -1. –  Andy Hayden Oct 30 '13 at 22:31

Here's a simple function which does this in one pass:

def maxes(a, key=None):
    if key is None:
        key = lambda x: x
    m, max_list = key(a[0]), []
    for s in a:
        k = key(s)
        if k > m:
            m, max_list = k, [s]
        elif k == m:
            max_list.append(s)
    return m, max_list

In action:

In [11]: maxes(['a', 'ab', 'a', 'cd'], key=len)
Out[11]: (2, ['ab', 'cd'])

This may, or may not be faster than running the list comprehension mentioned by the other poster and certainly faster than the sorting... but a little testing suggests its faster:

For a example of strings:

In [20]: a = [''.join(random.choice('abc') for _ in xrange(random.randint(1, 100)))
                                           for i in xrange(1000)]

In [21]: %timeit maxes(a, key=len)
10000 loops, best of 3: 53 µs per loop

In [22]: %timeit m = max(map(len, a)); [s for s in a if len(s) < m]
10000 loops, best of 3: 104 µs per loop

In [23]: %timeit sorted_a = sorted(a, key=len, reverse=True); [s for s in a if len(s) == len(sorted_a[0])]
1000 loops, best of 3: 322 µs per loop

If we look at integers, with a key:

In [30]: a = [random.randint(1, 10000) for i in xrange(1000)]

In [31]: %timeit maxes(a, key= lambda x: x**2)
10000 loops, best of 3: 150 µs per loop

In [32]: %timeit m = max(a, key=lambda x: x**2); [s for s in a if s**2 < m]
1000 loops, best of 3: 183 µs per loop

In [33]: %timeit sorted_a = sorted(a, key=lambda x: x**2, reverse=True); [s for s in a if s ** 2 == sorted_a[0] ** 2]
1000 loops, best of 3: 441 µs per loop

However, without a key the list comprehension is better:

In [34]: %timeit maxes(a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 98.1 µs per loop

In [35]: %timeit m = max(a); [s for s in a if s < m]
10000 loops, best of 3: 49.2 µs per loop

In [36]: %timeit sorted_a = sorted(a, reverse=True); [s for s in a if s == sorted_a[0]]
10000 loops, best of 3: 152 µs per loop

This is expected since the redundant key code is still being applied, if we were toremove that logic (replace calls to key(x) with just x) the function is again slightly faster:

In [37]: %timeit maxes2(a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 39.7 µs per loop
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