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How come I never see examples like these where you declare the hash, and then put then inside another hash?

my %hash1={};
$hash1{'key1'}='1-111';
$hash1{'key2'}='1-222';
$hash1{'key3'}='1-333';
my %hash2={};
$hash2{'key1'}='2-111';
$hash2{'key2'}='2-222';
$hash2{'key3'}='2-333';

my %main_hash1={%hash1, %hash2};

I've only seen examples like these where they put the hashes inside the hash, instead of a variable for the hash:

my %main_hash2=( 'hash1' => {
                            'key1' => '1-111',
                            'key2' => '1-222',
                            'key3' => '1-333'
                    },
             'hash2' => {
                            'key1' => '2-111',
                            'key2' => '2-222',
                            'key3' => '2-333'
                    }
);

(similar with arrays also)

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1  
%hash={} is wrong. %hash = (); $hashref = {}; –  mob May 30 '12 at 20:33
    
I highly recommend reading perldoc perlreftut, once you really understand that, Perl becomes a lot easier. –  Joel Berger May 30 '12 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't store a hash in a hash, you can store a hashref in a hash though:

my %main_hash1 = ( hash1 => \%hash1, hash2 => \%hash2 );

The same goes with arrays:

my @main_array1 = ( \@array1, \@array2 );

And with mixes:

my @array_of_hrefs = ( \%hash1, \%hash2 );
my %hash_of_arefs = ( arr1 => \@arr1, arr2 => \@arr2 );

This is done all the time; I don't know why you haven't seen it and I doubt anyone on SO would know that answer.

Also, this does not initialize a hash:

my %hash1={}; ## should be my %hash1; or my %hash1 = ();
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So in main_hash2, it is only storing a reference to a hash, not a hash itself? Reading about hash of hashes, I keep thinking you could do something like that %main_hash1=(%hash1, %hash2).... Maybe it should be term hash of hashrefs and arrays of arrayrefs instead.... Thanks for the clarification. –  mart2001 May 30 '12 at 20:36
    
%main_hash1=(%hash1, %hash2) is valid, but it merges the two hashes together rather than doing what you want. If %hash1 and %hash2 share any keys, it would only use the second one. –  gpojd May 31 '12 at 12:42

See the following example :

The Perl code :

my %hash1;
$hash1{'key1'}='1-111';
$hash1{'key2'}='1-222';
$hash1{'key3'}='1-333';

my %hash2;
$hash2{'key1'}='2-111';
$hash2{'key2'}='2-222';
$hash2{'key3'}='2-333';

my %main_hash = ( hash1 => \%hash1, hash2 => \%hash2 );
use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper %main_hash;

The output :

$VAR1 = 'hash2';
$VAR2 = {
          'key2' => '2-222',
          'key1' => '2-111',
          'key3' => '2-333'
        };
$VAR3 = 'hash1';
$VAR4 = {
          'key2' => '1-222',
          'key1' => '1-111',
          'key3' => '1-333'
        };

That use references, see http://perldoc.perl.org/perlreftut.html & if needed : http://perldoc.perl.org/perlref.html

There's a ref trick that makes things a bit magic :

my $hash_ref = {}; # reference to a blank hash

my %h = ( foo => "1", bar => "2" );

push @{$hash_ref->{'1st_level'}->{'level-2'}->{'level_3'}->{'arr'}}, 123;
push @{$hash_ref->{'1st_level'}->{'level-2'}->{'level_3'}->{'arr'}}, 456;
$hash_ref->{'1st_level'}->{'level-2'}->{'level_3'}->{'arr'}->[2] = \%h;
use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $hash_ref;

The output :

$VAR1 = {
          '1st_level' => {
                           'level-2' => {
                                          'level_3' => {
                                                         'arr' => [
                                                                    123,
                                                                    456,
                                                                    {
                                                                      'bar' => '2',
                                                                      'foo' => '1'
                                                                    }
                                                                  ]
                                                       }
                                        }
                         }
        };
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