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I am working with a code that contains following overloaded method in generic class:

public class A<T>
{
    public void Process(T item) { /*impl*/ }
    public void Process(string item) { /*impl*/ }
}

When parametrizing the class for string do I lose the possibility to call the version with generic parameter?

var a = new A<string>();
a.Process(""); //Always calls the non-generic Process(string)
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is one way I just discovered, but it's a bit cross-eyed. Because generics and overloading get resolved in build time, you can define a generic method:

public static CallerClass
{
    public static CallGenericOverload<T>(GenericClass<T> cls, T val)
    {
        return cls.ProblemOverload(val); 
    }   

    //We can also make an extension method. 
    //We don't have to of course, it's just more comfortable this way.
    public static CallGenericOverloadExtension<T>(this GenericClass<T> cls, T val)
    {
        return cls.ProblemOverload(val);
    }

}

public GenericClass<T>
{
     public string ProblemOverload(T val)
     {
         return "ProblemOverload(T val)";
     }
     public string ProblemOverload(string val)
     {
         return "ProblemOverload(string val)";
     }
}

Now, if we do the following:

var genClass = new GenericClass<string>();
Console.WriteLine(genClass.ProblemOverload("")); //output: ProblemOverload(string val)
Console.WriteLine(CallerClass.CallGenericOverload(genClass, "")); //output: ProblemOverload(T val)
Console.WriteLine(genClass.CallGenericOverloadExtension("")); //output: ProblemOverload(T val)

You can use a similar trick if you define a generic class instead of a generic method. The important thing is that the parameter you transfer to ProblemOverload needs to be of type T rather than type string in the invocation. After all, the method CallGenericOverload knows it's getting a T at build time, so it's going to bind to the overload that accepts the parameter. It doesn't matter that it's actually going to get a string at runtime.

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Weird but lovely at the same time! –  Jay May 30 '12 at 21:03
    
This should have been the accepted answer! –  Jay May 30 '12 at 21:49

You could also derive classes from A such as AString which are not generic but still have a generic method....

public class A<T>
{

    public void Process<t>(t item)
    {

        if (typeof(t) == typeof(string))
        {
            this.Process(item.ToString());
            return;
        }

        /*impl*/

    }

    public void Process(string item) { /*impl*/ }
}

public class AString
    : A<String>
{
    public new void Process<T>(T item)
    {
        base.Process<T>(item);
    }
}

Both ways work..

       var x = new A<String>();
        x.Process("");
        x.Process<String>("");

        var y = new AString();
        y.Process("");
        y.Process<String>("");

Personally I would move the ugly typeof check to the Derived and handle it there...

Outputs: (If you replace /*impl*/ with Console.WriteLine)

From Non Generic
From Non Generic
From Non Generic
From Non Generic

You can also call mark the method private and then only expose the Generic. From the outside the method would be called with Reflection if needed.

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Perhaps you should add more details. Especially a code sample. And why do you have two answers? –  Kendall Frey May 30 '12 at 20:43
    
My other was deleted... because I was not high.. and since I am a code example will follow:P –  Jay May 30 '12 at 20:53
    
It doesn't look deleted to me. –  Kendall Frey May 30 '12 at 20:54
2  
Oh, and by the way, you aren't supposed to be high when answering questions. :P –  Kendall Frey May 30 '12 at 20:58
1  
I think perhaps you read the question wrong. You keep doing the opposite of what is asked. –  Kendall Frey May 30 '12 at 21:57

Having done this before, I'm inclined to say "No," but there's always more knowledgable folks who would argue otherwise.

If memory serves, the runtime compiler chooses the most strongly typed overload to execute.

CLARIFICATION

My answer is badly worded, and I deserve the downvote.

The OP asked, "When parametrizing the class for string do I lose the possibility to call the version with generic parameter?" I wasn't answering that "No, you can't do that," but that "No, you don't lose the ability to call the version with the generic parameter."

I should have been more clear.

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2  
Actually, this is resolved at compile time. The runtime doesn't choose anything. –  Park Young-Bae May 30 '12 at 20:25
    
Well said. I thought that was the case, but that's what I get for posting while under the influnce of Cough Syrup. :-/ –  Mike Hofer May 30 '12 at 20:36
    
Hm, re. your clarification: actually you DO lose the ability to call te version with the generic parameter (if the parameter is of type string, which is what the OP asks). –  jeroenh May 30 '12 at 21:28
    
Not if you explicitly call it as I have shown... cough syrup or not... but it does help :P –  Jay May 30 '12 at 21:29

Yes. This is documented in the C# spec, section 7.5.3, overload resolution.

From 7.5.3.6:

"While signatures as declared must be unique, it is possible that substitution of type arguments results in identical signatures. In such cases, the tie-breaking rules of overload resolution above will pick the most specific member."

The example given in there states that in the case below, overload resolution for G<int>.F1 will pick non-generic

class G1<U>
{
    int F1(U u);
    int F1(int i);
}

The tie-breaking rule that applies here is outlined in 7.5.3.2, "Better function member":

In case the parameter type sequences {P1, P2, …, PN} and {Q1, Q2, …, QN} are equivalent (i.e. each Pi has an identity conversion to the corresponding Qi), the following tie-breaking rules are applied, in order, to determine the better function member.

  • If MP is a non-generic method and MQ is a generic method, then MP is better than MQ.
share|improve this answer
    
Like the answer, don't like the rule... but fortunately you can call the method explictly –  Jay May 30 '12 at 21:49
    
@Jay: No, you can't... –  Kendall Frey May 30 '12 at 21:51

Specific types take precedence over generic types.

For example, this is what I tested with in LINQPad.

void Main()
{
    new A<string>().Process("Hello");
}

public class A<T>
{
    public void Process(T item) { Console.WriteLine("T"); }
    public void Process(string item) { Console.WriteLine("string"); }
}

// Output: string

If you have a problem with hiding the generic method, then you need to rethink something. By overloading a generic method with specific types, you are effectively saying, "Use the generic overload if you need to, but if you can, use the specific version, because it should know what is best."

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So I take it then the answer is yes? –  mellamokb May 30 '12 at 20:22
    
Yep. The answer is "Yes." –  Mike Hofer May 30 '12 at 20:23
    

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