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I have a function here that loops through two wrappers and then loops through it's respective children and throws it a number to list out items in numerical order. Instead of using a for loop, I've decided to use the each jQuery function. Here is my question:

Which way is better to achieve this and what are the advantages/disadvantages by going one way or the other?? Is it better to use a for loop??

This:

$(".articleContentWrapper").each( function () { 
    var i = 1;
    $(this).find(".howToStepNumber").each(function () {
        var b = i++;
        $(this).html(b);
    });
});

Or this:

$(".articleContentWrapper").each( function () { 
    var i = 1;
    $(this).find(".howToStepNumber").each(function () {
        $(this).html(i++);
    });
});
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closed as too localized by j08691, Esailija, Vega, Sam Dufel, bmargulies May 30 '12 at 20:40

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There are no advantages to var b = i++; $(this).html(b);. You're just wasting memory. –  lanzz May 30 '12 at 20:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about this?

$(".articleContentWrapper").each( function () { 
    $(this).find(".howToStepNumber").each(function (i, e) {
        $(this).html(i + 1);
    });
});

The .each() method already provides an index holder so you don't need to create one yourself.

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1  
In OP code i starts from 1 :P –  Vega May 30 '12 at 20:32
    
What's the e being passed in .each represent? –  Sethen May 30 '12 at 20:33
1  
That is the DOM Element of the index. So you could also write $(e).html(i + 1); instead of $(this).html(i + 1); –  Johannes Klauß May 30 '12 at 20:36
    
@SethenMaleno api.jquery.com/jQuery.each –  Kyle Trauberman May 30 '12 at 20:36
    
I am under the impression that it's better not to try and pass a variable that needs to be incremented within the html function itself. Rather, to increment before. –  Sethen May 30 '12 at 20:38

Try like below,

$(".howToStepNumber", $(".articleContentWrapper")).html( function () {
    return $(this).index() + 1;
});

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
I really like this one. A nice approach. –  Johannes Klauß May 30 '12 at 20:40
    
I've never seen it written like $(".howToStepNumber", $(".articleContentWrapper")) how does that work? –  Sethen May 30 '12 at 20:47
1  
It is equivalent to $(".articleContentWrapper").find ('.howToStepNumber') –  Vega May 30 '12 at 20:50
    
@Vega thanks for clearing that up. Very interesting. –  Sethen May 30 '12 at 20:53
var wrapper = $(".articleContentWrapper");
$(".howToStepNumber", wrapper).text( function (i) { 
    return ( i % (wrapper.length + 1) ) + 1;
});​

http://jsfiddle.net/kVUBu/1/

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I would probably write it as:

$(".articleContentWrapper").each( function () { 
    $(".howToStepNumber", this).each(function (i) {
        $(this).html(i);  // or i+1 depending on what you want
    });
});

The find really isn't necessary either and makes the statement longer.

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