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I have the following query

var customers = from customer in context.tblAccounts 
                join assoc in context.tblAccountAssociations on customer.AccountCode equals assoc.ChildCode 
                where customer.AccountType == "S" || customer.AccountType == "P" 
                select customer, assoc;

C# does not like the "assoc" at the end.

My error message is:

A local variable named 'assoc' cannot be declared in this scope because it would give a different meaning to 'assoc', which is already used in a 'child' scope to denote something else.

I need to return all columns from both table and then iterate with a

foreach (var customer in customers)

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3  
Can't you just... change the name of the variable? –  GreĝRos May 30 '12 at 20:47
    
Do you need 2 separate objects returned or do you need a property of the customer object populated? –  Tim Hobbs May 30 '12 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why do you have this line:

select customer, assoc;

Are you trying to return a customer, an assoc, or both? Assuming the latter, you can combine them using anonymous types:

select new { Customer = customer, Assoc = assoc };

Then each item in customers would have two properties, Customer and Assoc and you can grab what you need from either.

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Thank you very much! –  dorkboy May 30 '12 at 21:04

You could wrap both of the items in an anonymous type.

var customers = from customer in context.tblAccounts 
            join assoc in context.tblAccountAssociations on customer.AccountCode equals assoc.ChildCode 
            where customer.AccountType == "S" || customer.AccountType == "P" 
            select new {customer, assoc};
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