Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am beginning to use Python for my scientific computing, and I am really liking it a lot, however I am confused by a feature of the matplotlib.pylab.legend function. In particular, the location feature allows one to specifiy the location of their legend using numbers, following this scheme:

  • best -- 0
  • upper right -- 1
  • upper left -- 2
  • lower left -- 3
  • lower right -- 4
  • right -- 5
  • center left -- 6
  • center right -- 7
  • lower center -- 8
  • upper center -- 9
  • center -- 10

Does anyone know why you wouldn't use the ordering on the numpad? I.e. center -- 5, upper right -- 9, etc.

I am just curious if anyone knows.

share|improve this question
    
You usually specify the string 'center' in place of 10. Try it. –  Blender May 30 '12 at 20:58
    
well, maybe the developers were primarily coding in starbucks using their tiny teeny little numpad-less laptops. –  nye17 May 30 '12 at 22:40
2  
Actually, they were deliberately mimicking matlab's behavior at the time. See the "obsolete location values" section in the documentation for MATLAB's legend: mathworks.com/help/techdoc/ref/legend.html –  Joe Kington May 31 '12 at 1:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The docs show this example:

legend( ('label1', 'label2', 'label3'), loc='upper left')

Presumably, you could write loc=2, but why would you? It's much more readable to use the English word.

As to why they didn't enumerate the values to align with the numeric keypad, I presume they weren't thinking about the numeric keypad at the time.

Edit: It's worth including here the full text of Joe Kington's comment:

Actually, they were deliberately mimicking matlab's behavior at the time. See the "obsolete location values" section in the documentation for MATLAB's legend: mathworks.com/help/techdoc/ref/legend.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.