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Comparator<? super E> comparator()

This method is declared in the Sorted Set interface.

What does the super mean?

How is the above method different from a Generic Method, and a method with Wildcard arguments.

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2  
"What is the diff"? –  Oli Charlesworth May 30 '12 at 21:21
1  
comparator() –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz May 30 '12 at 21:21
1  
It "Returns the comparator used to order the elements in this set, or null if this set uses the natural ordering of its elements." The API docs also state "Returns: the comparator used to order the elements in this set, or null if this set uses the natural ordering of its elements". Are you asking about the <? super E> gobbledegook? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 30 '12 at 21:23
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This means that the type of comparison can be a supertype of the current type.

Eg. you can have the following:

static class A {
}

static class B extends A {
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Comparator<A> comparator = new Comparator<A>() {
        public int compare(A a1, A b2) {
            return 0;
        }
    };

    // TreeSet.TreeSet<B>(Comparator<? super B> c)
    SortedSet<B> set = new TreeSet<B>(comparator);

    // Comparator<? super B> comparator()
    set.comparator();
}

In this case, A is a supertype of B.

I hope this has been helpful.

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A SortedSet needs to have some rules that it uses to determine the sorting. The Comparator is the implementation of these rules. The interface provides a method to get a reference to it so that you can use it for other purposes, such as creating another set that uses the same sorting rules.

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From the javadoc:

"Returns the comparator used to order the elements in this set, or null if this set uses the natural ordering of its elements."

:)

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"Super" here means that the method is not required to return a Comparator for E. It might instead return a Comparator for any superclass of E. So, to make that concrete, if E were String, this method could give you a more general Comparator for Object.

A generic method would declare a new generic parameter of its own. This method merely references the generic parameter E which was declared by the class declaration SortedSet<E>. Generic methods are less common. They are usually static, like the Arrays method

public static <T> List<T> asList(T...)

Here, T is declared and used only in this method. It shows that the type of the objects in the returned list is the same as the type of the objects in the vararg parameter.

I'm not sure the exact definition of wild card arguments. ? Is the wild card character. The general pattern when you get a wild card parameter like List<?> is that you can take objects out of it and cast them to Object but you can't put anything in.

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The answer to this is in the interface declaration: public interface SortedSet<E> extends Set<E> { ...

This means that any class that implements SortedSet should specify which Type they will be working with. For example

class MyClass implements SortedSet<AnotherClass>

and this will produce (using eclipse), a bunch of methods such as

    public Comparator<? super AnotherClass> comparator()
{
    return null;
}

public boolean add( AnotherClass ac)
{
    return false;
}

Of cause this will work with all sub-classes of AnotherClass as Paul Vargas pointed out.

The other aspect you might be missing is that Comparator is also an interface: public interface Comparator<T>. So what you are returning is an implementation of this.

Just for interest another useful way to use the Comparator interface is to specify it anonymously as part of the Arrays.sort(Object[] a, Comparator c) method:

If we had an Person class we could use this method to sort on age and name like this:

    Person[] people = ....;
// Sort by Age
    Arrays.sort(people, new Comparator<Person>()
    {
        public int compare( Person p1, Person p2 )
        {
            return p1.getAge().compareTo(p2.getAge());
        }
    });


// Sort by Name
    Arrays.sort(people, new Comparator<Person>()
    {
        public int compare( Person p1, Person p2 )
        {
            return p1.getName().compareTo(p2.getName());
        }
    });
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