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There is something that is troubling my brain since a moment: I am trying to overload the [] operator based on the return type. Here is what I need to do:

class A {

private:
    double* data_;
    int N_;
public:
    A (N=0):N_(N){
        data_ = new double[N];
    }
    ~A {delete[] data_;}

    double operator[] (const int i) {
        return data_[i];
    }

    double* operator[] (const int i) {
        return &data[i]; // for example; in fact here i need to return some block of data_ 
    }
};

This code won't compile; and that is my problem. Can someone help me to solve this problem?

PS: I know how to overload normal functions on the return type for example:

int foo ();
string foo ();

I used some tricks that I read in this forum. In this way:

struct func {
    operator string() { return "1";}
    operator int() { return 2; }
};

int main( ) {
    int x    = func(); // calls int version
    string y = func(); // calls string version
    double d = func(); // calls int version
    cout << func() << endl; // calls int version
    func(); // calls neither
}

Thank you.

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6  
"PS: i know how to overload normal functions on the return type for example" Are you sure about that? –  ildjarn May 30 '12 at 21:33
    
What forum are you talking about? –  Paulpro May 30 '12 at 21:33
    
Can you please tell us how to overload purely on return type? I think many people here would like to know too, since they dont know... –  PlasmaHH May 30 '12 at 21:46
    
just follow this link [link]stackoverflow.com/questions/442026/… –  moose May 30 '12 at 22:04
    
@user1427050 : That link says it can't be done in C++. What are you getting at? –  ildjarn May 30 '12 at 22:24
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3 Answers 3

Two method overloads must have different signatures. The return type is not part of the signature of a method.

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2  
+1; C++11 citation, §1.3.20: "signature <class member function>: name, parameter type list, class of which the function is a member, cv-qualifiers (if any), and ref-qualifier (if any)" –  ildjarn May 30 '12 at 21:44
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You can use the same "trick" that you use for functions, that is use a proxy object with conversion operators:

class A
{
  private:
    double* data_;
    int N_;
  public:
    A (int N = 0)
      : N_(N), data_(new double[N])
    {}
    ~A() { delete[] data_; }

    struct proxy
    {
        int i;
        double * data;
        operator double() const
        {
            return data[i];
        }

        operator double*()
        {
            return &data[i];
        }

        operator double const *() const
        {
            return &data[i];
        }
    };

    proxy operator[] (int const i) {
        proxy p { i, data_ };        
        return p;
    }

    proxy const operator[] (int const i) const {
        proxy p { i, data_ };        
        return p;
    }
};

int main()
{
  {
    A a(12);

    double d = a[0];
    double * pd = a[0];
  }

  {
    A const ca(12);

    double d = ca[0];
    //double * pd = ca[0]; // does not compile thanks to overloads on const
    double const * pcd = ca[0];
  }
}

However, I would argue that this is a terrible idea. Having your operator[] return either a value or a pointer to this value is guaranteed to confuse the users of your class, in addition to making it impractical to use in expressions where both types are possible. For instance, std::cout << a[0]; would not compile (ambiguous overloads).

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Nice effort, but +1 for mentioning it is a terrible idea. –  Eric Jun 19 '12 at 8:57
    
thanks! finally i decided to create another member function instead to overload the 'operator[]' –  moose Jul 8 '12 at 20:34
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Probably you need something like that:

class A {

private:
    double* data_;
    int N_;
    ... // other stuff
public:
    double operator[] (const int i) const { // note const here
        return data_[i];
    }

    double& operator[] (const int i) { // note reference here
        return data_[i];
    }
};

also operator should be public to have a sense.

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in fact what i need is to return a set {data_[i], data_[i+1]} of 2 double (this is possible by using some SSE instrinsics)... –  moose May 30 '12 at 22:01
    
Note that after you have operator define like I wrote you can use it like that: '&object[i]' and you will get address/pointer you need for some other processing. –  Marek R May 31 '12 at 7:26
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