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I'm sure this is an easy question, but in creating a mock shell in C++, there is one aspect of the project that I don't quite understand.

Basically, we're creating a program called myShell, invoked with the command "./myShell". That will open up the custom shell, but what I want to be able to do, is call external functions right from the command with the token "-c".

For example, the command: "./myShell -c ls -l" will call the linux ls function. I can do this once the program is actually invoked, but not before (i.e. opening ./myShell, then typing ls -l".

I'm new to processes, and any help would be appreciated.

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2  
This is too vague at the moment. What is the specific technical issue that's holding you back? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 30 '12 at 22:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have code that waits for user input, interprets the commands that it reads from the user, runs them, and goes back to waiting for user input in a loop, like this pseudocode:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    bool must_exit = false;
    while (!must_exit) {
        string input = read_user_input();
        must_exit = interpret_and_run(input);
    }
    return 0;
}

Modify your function to concatenate argvs and run them before entering the loop:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    bool must_exit = false;
    if (argc > 2 && !strcmp(argv[1], "-c")) {
        string input = concatenate(argv); // From 1 to N, not from 0 to N
        must_exit = interpret_and_run(input);
    }
    while (!must_exit) {
        string input = read_user_input();
        must_exit = interpret_and_run(input);
    }
    return 0;
}
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Perfect. Exactly what I needed. –  twsmale May 30 '12 at 22:39

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