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In the following code, when func2b is called, 'this' is the DOMWindow, and not a reference to obj2. Why is func2b loosing it's reference to obj2 as 'this'?

Here's a version on jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/qqzKh/

var obj1 = {
  init: function() {
    this.prefix = "Stop!";
    obj2.func2a(this.func1a);
  }
  ,func1a: function(message) {
    console.log(this.prefix + " " + message);
  }
};
var obj2 = {
  func2a: function(callback) {
    this.callback = callback;
    console.log(this.callback); // Correct reference to obj1.func1a
    obj3.func3a(this.func2b);
  }
  ,func2b: function(message) {
    console.log(this); // Unexpectedly returns DOMWindow
    this.callback(message);
  }
};
var obj3 = {
  func3a: function(callback) {
    callback("Hammer Time.");
  }
}
obj1.init();

SOLUTION

var obj1 = {
  init: function() {
    this.prefix = "Stop!";
    obj2.func2a(this, this.func1a);
  }
  ,func1a: function(message) {
    console.log(this.prefix + " " + message);
  }
};
var obj2 = {
  func2a: function(owner, callback) {
    this.owner = owner;
    this.callback = callback;
    obj3.func3a(this, this.func2b);
  }
  ,func2b: function(message) {
    this.callback.call(this.owner, message);
  }
};
var obj3 = {
  func3a: function(owner, callback) {
    callback.call(owner, "Hammer Time.");
  }
}
obj1.init();

share|improve this question
2  
Functions are not bound, what this refers to depends on how the function is called. Read the MDN documentation about this. –  Felix Kling May 30 '12 at 22:16
    
because the this binding is per-call-basis and depends on how the function is called, not where the function is stored. If you call a function directly (fun()) in non-strict mode, it will always be window in browser. –  Esailija May 30 '12 at 22:16
    
Thanks for the link, @FelixKling. Not quite sure yet what I need to change in my example to make this work, but I'll keep reading. –  scader May 30 '12 at 22:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if you do:

a.f()

then a is called 'this' in the body of f.

if you do:

f()

then window is called 'this' in the body of f.

Edit: as Esailija said:

you're using callback("Hammer Time.") like f() is called in this answer.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense theoretically, but how does that translate into my example? –  scader May 30 '12 at 22:35
1  
@scader you're calling the callback("Hammer Time.") like f() is called in this answer. You are not calling callback as a property of any object, like lol.callback(). Note that you don't really need the function to be property of some object to get what you want, you can also say callback.call(lol, "HAmmer time") which will explicitly bind this to lol for the call. Or in your example callback.call( obj2, "Hammer Time.") –  Esailija May 30 '12 at 22:36
    
Well said @Esailija. –  Lyn Headley May 30 '12 at 22:40
    
Thanks for the explanation. That implies that obj2 is always the one calling. What if func3a is called by several objects. How do I assign the correct reference in the call method? –  scader May 30 '12 at 22:47
    
pass in the caller to func3a. –  Lyn Headley May 30 '12 at 22:49

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