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I am curious about how pushing back into a vector works. I want a way to push back an element and then be able to add it's location in the vector to a double array serving as a type of map.

Something like this:

// Create a bomb
Bomb b;
b.currentTime = SDL_GetTicks();
b.explodeTime = SDL_GetTicks() + 3000;
b.owner = player;
b.power = 2;    
b.x = x;
b.y = y;

bombVec.push_back(b);

bombs[y][x] = THIS_IS_WHAT_I_WANT;

This way when I explode the bomb, I can check the map and then have an ID in the vector to deal with. Every non bomb square will have a -1. Also, just curious. Imagine I have 3 elements in a vector. I delete the second one and then add another. Does the new element go in the same location as the one that was deleted?

Thanks!

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1  
Deleting from a vector is not a good idea. It requires all the elements to be shifted. And no, it will not be inserted where the other was deleted, but always in the end of the array. You might want to take a look at list – Shahbaz May 30 '12 at 22:41
1  
@StevenBurnap, that is the iterator to the last element, not the last element itself. *bombVec.rbegin() or otherwise bombVec.back() would be the last element. Using its index would be bombVec[bombVec.size()-1] – Shahbaz May 30 '12 at 22:42
    
Of course you can delete from vectors...there's nothing wrong with that. It would be a pretty useless data type if you could never remove anything from them! Now if you're working on an algorithm that needs to be very efficient, making a bunch of add/delete calls to a vector is a bad idea...because yes, deleting requires other elements to be shifted. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with deleting an object from a vector. – WendiKidd May 30 '12 at 22:43
    
What is the type of bombs? – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 30 '12 at 22:56
up vote 4 down vote accepted

After you push_back, you can use back to get the element.

Bomb b;
...
bombVec.push_back(b);
Bomb &bref = bombVec.back();

Or do you want the index?

Obligatory warning: If you push another item in, and the capacity isn't large enough, the vector will be resized. This will invalidate the reference and will cause program errors if the reference is accessed. This isn't a problem with (1) accessing by index (2) if pointers are stored in the vector (3) if you use list instead (4) if you don't resize the vector.

Getting the index:

size_t index = bombVec.size();
bombVec.push_back(b);
share|improve this answer
    
I need the index. Thanks! And yes, I will ensure the vector will never be resized. If I reserve 15 elements and although more than 15 elements are created but not more than 10 at a time, does this still prevent resizing? – Satchmo Brown May 30 '12 at 22:51
    
Yes, that will prevent resizing. – Dietrich Epp May 30 '12 at 22:52
    
Thank you Dietrich. Very helpful. – Satchmo Brown May 30 '12 at 22:54
1  
Obligatory warning (extended): The reference can also become invalid if elements are erased from the vector and basically whenever an operation modifies the container. – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 30 '12 at 22:58
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas What about the index? – Satchmo Brown May 30 '12 at 23:02

Let's start from the end:

Also, just curious. Imagine I have 3 elements in a vector. I delete the second one and then add another. Does the new element go in the same location as the one that was deleted?

Delete has a precise meaning in the language, which makes no sense in this context, so I will assume that you mean erase from the container. When you erase an element from a vector, all elements with indices greater than the erased element are moved (or copied) filling in the empty space left by the erased element. If you push_back a new element that element will be added to the back of the container, so it will not take the same location.

Another option is not erasing the original element but writing the new element over the location where the older element is: v[ idx ] = new_value;. Which brings us to the first part of the question:

I want a way to push back an element and then be able to add it's location in the vector to a double array serving as a type of map

The problem with using a vector as the underlying container is that any mutating operation on the container invalidates iterators and references to the stored elements. For example, the erase above will invalidate iterators and pointers to all elements with greater indices (technically it invalidates all iterators according to the standard, but in practice....). Adding elements to the container can be even worse as it can actually invalidate all iterators/references if the vector needs to grow.

A common suggested alternative is keeping indices to the location of the element. While indices are stable if the container grows, they will refer to the wrong location if you erase from the container, so you will need to be careful on how you operate. If you can manage not to remove elements from the vector (for example adding a flag that marks a bomb as removed but not actually remove it from the container) then the problem becomes much simpler.

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