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E.g. let's say I have this class:

public class Foo Implements Fooable {
  public void a() {
    // does some stuff
    bar = b();
    // moar coadz
  }
  public Bar b() {
    // blah
  }
  // ...
}

And I want to test Foo.a. I want to mock Foo.b, because I'm testing that method separately. What I'm imagining is something like this:

public class FooTest extends TestCase {
  public void testA() {
    Fooable foo = createPartialMock(
      Fooable.class,  // like with createMock
      Foo  // class where non-mocked method implementations live
    );

    // Foo's implementation of b is not used.
    // Rather, it is replaced with a dummy implementation
    // that records calls that are supposed to be made;
    // and returns a hard coded value (i.e. new Bar()).
    expect(foo.b()).andReturn(new Bar());

    // The rest is the same as with createMock:
    //   1. Stop recording expected calls.
    //   2. Run code under test.
    //   3. Verify that recorded calls were made.
    replay(foo);
    foo.a();
    verify(foo);
  }
}

I know I can write my own Foo subclass to do this sort of thing for me. But I don't want to do that if I don't have to, because it's tedious i.e. should be automated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess you can do that using the EasyMock extensions library. You can find a simple example here in this Partial Mocking

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Thank you! Sadly, it seems that you need Junit 4 in order to use classextensions :( : easymock.org/EasyMock2_2_ClassExtension_Documentation.html I guess this means Junit 3 users are out of luck. –  allyourcode May 30 '12 at 22:55
    
Ohh...that's a good info for me as well...i have a thought on your case...but its not using easy mock rather creating mocks by ourselves by overriding the methods and return your mock Bar object from the extended Mock class. –  raddykrish May 30 '12 at 22:59
2  
As of EasyMock 3.1, the ClassExtensions library is deprecated and partial mocking has been moved into EasyMock itself. This says that it works with JUnit 3 so you may be in luck: easymock.org/EasyMock3_1_Documentation.html –  DoctorRuss May 31 '12 at 10:16
    
@DoctorRuss You are awesome! –  allyourcode Jun 3 '12 at 7:28

In EasyMock 3.0+, you can create Partial mock using the mockbuilder

EasyMock.createMockBuilder(class).addMockedMethod(“MethodName”).createMock();
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I would find a way to upgrade to JUnit 4, and use classextensions. (Actually, I would use Mockito instead of EasyMock, but let's not rewrite your whole test suite.) If you can't, then you could always create your own spy thusly:

public class FooTest extends TestCase {
    public static class FooSpy extends Foo {
        private final Fooable mockFoo;

        FooSpy(Fooable mockFoo) {
            this.mockFoo = mockFoo;
        }

        public Bar b() {
            return mockFoo.b();
        }
    }

    public void testA() {
        Fooable mockFoo = createMock(Foo.class);
        Fooable fooSpy = new FooSpy(mockFoo);

        // Foo's implementation of b is not used.
        // Rather, it is replaced with a dummy implementation
        // that records calls that are supposed to be made;
        // and returns a hard coded value (i.e. new Bar()).
        expect(mockFoo.b()).andReturn(new Bar());

        // The rest is the same as with createMock:
        // 1. Stop recording expected calls.
        // 2. Run code under test.
        // 3. Verify that recorded calls were made.
        replay(mockFoo);
        foo.a();
        verify(foo);
    }

}
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But not writing FooSpy is sort of the point. –  allyourcode May 31 '12 at 10:05
    
It's sort of the point, unless you are hamstrung by not being able to use classextensions - so you don't have a framework to create your spy for you. It looks like you might be in luck, though, based on the @DoctorRuss's comment. –  jhericks May 31 '12 at 21:26

The OP appears(?) to be suggesting that subclassing is somehow more difficult or tedious than partial mocking. I suggest it's worth rethinking that.

For example, in the test class:

  Foo dummyFoo = new Foo() {
      @Override public Bar b() { return new Bar(); }
   };

does what the OP states, seems simpler, and less prone to other problems (forgetting to replay/verify/etc.), than using EasyMock.

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I didn't know you could do this in Java! I guess this came out after 1.4? Anyway, can you use this to create a mock, similar to what jhericks suggests? If so, that'd be cool, because you then don't have to create a whole new (sub)class that calls the mock for methods not under test. –  allyourcode Jul 8 '12 at 19:22

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