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I'm posting this because i'm curious about something. For example, let's take a look at this sample code (just as an example):

    -(void)doSomething{
         for (int i=0;i<10000000000;i++){
             nslog(@"%i", int);
         }
         nslog(@"i'm done!");
    }

Is there any way to execute the for loop in the same method (doSomething) but in another thread without the need of doing something like NSOperationQueue(@selector)?
And the NSLog must be executed only after the for loop is finished.
If there's something out there, example code would be appreciated!
Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use GCD with dispatch_async. But the i'm done NSLog won't be executed after all the iterations are done. It doesn't make sense because it would have to wait on the primary (main) thread for the background (iterations) thread to finish.

You'd have to execute the whole method in background thread if you don't want to block the main one for the UI.

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Technically dispatch_sync could run the loop on another thread, and block until it's finished, letting the NSLog run only after completion. –  Matt Wilding May 30 '12 at 23:16
    
@MattWilding I agree, but why wait in another thread, when you'd have to execute code on the main thread after the background code has been executed? –  Eimantas May 31 '12 at 7:50
    
I was just pointing out a technicality. Otherwise I completely agree with you; there doesn't seem to be a point, especially in that example. –  Matt Wilding May 31 '12 at 13:47
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What's the nature of the code you're writing? Do you want to speed up the expensive for loop? Do you want the containing method to block until the loop is done, or do you simply want to execute the NSLog() after the loop is finished? Without knowing more information, here are a few of your options:

- (void)doSomething
{
  dispatch_apply(10000000000, dispatch_get_global_queue(), ^(size_t i) {
    NSLog(@"%d", i);
  });

  NSLog(@"I'm done!");
}

Or

- (void)doSomething
{
  dispatch_queue_t calling_queue = dispatch_get_current_queue();
  dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(), ^{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000000; i++)
    {
      NSLog(@"%d", i);
    }

    dispatch_async(calling_queue, ^{
      NSLog(@"I'm done!");
    });
  });
}
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Note that dispatch_get_current_queue()'s behavior is rather... different... depending on which thread and/or queue it is invoked on. Read the docs closely before going down that route. –  bbum May 31 '12 at 1:36
    
@bbum: I'd love if you could expand on that! The above code vaguely resembles code I've written before and I'd love to know about any potential gotchas in it. Is the problem that I should be retaining the queue / there's a deadlock opportunity / something else? –  Sedate Alien May 31 '12 at 1:55
    
See the man page for dispatch_get_current_queue() as it explains the different possible return values. –  bbum May 31 '12 at 4:07
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I believe dispatch_asyc calls every block passed to it in order, so in theory you could run:

for (int i=0;i<10000000;i++){
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(), ^{
        for (int x=i*1000;x<1000;x++){ NSLog(@"%i", x); }
    });
}
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(), ^{
    NSLog(@"i'm done!");
}

I haven't tested that and it would probably be a stretch to put that many items on the queue at once though.

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The nature of a concurrent queue is that no block will be started before a block that was enqueued before it, but it may be run at the same time and thus finish first. Thus there's no guarantee here that "I'm done" won't be printed before all of the for loops have completed. –  Josh Caswell May 31 '12 at 18:17
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