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I write a library which uses Qt's meta type system. The user of my library can provide values of custom types which get wrapped in a QVariant. Later in some code internally in the library, I need to serialise this QVariant. I implemented serializers for a couple of types and I really don't need to support every type known to the Qt meta type system. I serialise the values in order to send them over the network using JSON.

But what I'd like to achieve is to support custom enum types, which the user has to register to the meta type system using qtRegisterMetaType<MyEnum>("MyEnum"); anyway. I want to serialise such an enum via converting it to an integer type.

I tried QVariant::value<int>() on such an enum value, but it always returns 0. QVariant::canConvert<int>() returns false.

Is it possible (maybe using some dirty hacking) to get to the integer value of the wrapped enum? How does Qt handle enum values in its meta type system? Maybe I can just access the raw void* pointer when I'm sure that this is an enum value I have here.

This leads us to the next question: How to check if a Qt meta type is a user enum type at all?

Please note that since I'm writing internal code of the library, I can't use templates. The only "thing" I have is the QVariant, no compile-time type information.

// code in the project using my library:
MyEnum foo;
libraryFunction(foo);
// internal library code (note that compile-time type info isn't available):
QVariant foo = getValueAsVariant(...);
if (/* how to check if foo is an enum type? */)
    int enumValue = foo.value<int>(); // not working for enums!

I know that the C++ compiler can choose to use any integer type (not only 32-bit ones) internally to store enum values. Can this be a problem for me? (If I reinterpret the void* as int* for example. But remember that the void* data is allocated by QVariant itself, so it may allocate more than, for example, 2 bytes for a enum with sizeof == 2.)

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A dirty hack would be to serialize the QVariant to a QDataStream, then deserialize the last 4 bytes to an int. This doesn't answer the question of how to check for an enum type. I'll dig deeper into the moc output and update this.

Leemes has helpfully found that QMetaObject::enumerator() will give you all meta enums defined in a class. This is enough for checking if a given type name is an enum or not, as one can convert the enum names to the type IDs using QMetaType::type() (but prepending the class name and "::"). In order to convert from QVariant holding an enum to an int, one simply reinterprets the QVariant::constData() as an int pointer and reads it. It works.

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Thank you. What I have found out so far about the moc output: After using Q_ENUMS(MyEnum) in the header file, the moc generates entries in the string data for each enum. It contains the enum name and all entries with their names. This looks nice. But I don't know how to access this string data externally. UPDATE: This is, of course, only possible for member enums, not for enums in the global scope. But I can stick to that restriction very well. My library is told about every QMetaObject with possible meta enums in them anyway. Scanning them would suffice. –  leemes May 31 '12 at 1:39
    
With "member enums" I meant enums defined within the class. This was a wrong term. –  leemes May 31 '12 at 1:52
    
Ok I've got it. QMetaObject::enumerator() will give me all meta enums defined in a class. This is enough for checking if a given type name is an enum or not, as I can convert the enum names to the type IDs using QMetaType::type() (but prepending the class name and "::"). In order to convert from QVariant holding an enum to an int, I simply reinterpret the QVariant::constData() as an int pointer and read it. It works. But if you found out more while "digging deeper into the moc output", please let me know. I accept your answer because it showed me the correct way ;) Thank you! –  leemes May 31 '12 at 2:34
1  
Glad I could be of little help :) I have seriously missed that ::enumerator() member of QMetaObject! Thanks, I think you've helped me out too! –  Kuba Ober May 31 '12 at 17:30
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Glad I could help, too :) Maybe you want to add this to your answer to help others reading it? –  leemes May 31 '12 at 17:52
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