Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First of all, any suggestions on rewriting my title?

Issue: I have an AJAX updatable div, when my error checking alert calls are in, everything works perfect. But when I remove a specific one, the DIV never gets updated. I know it sounds confusing, but code is as follows, and then I will explain further.

AJAX SCRIPT

var xmlhttp
    /*@cc_on @*/
    /*@if (@_jscript_version >= 5)
      try {
      xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP")
     } catch (e) {
      try {
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP")
      } catch (E) {
       xmlhttp=false
      }
     }
    @else
     xmlhttp=false
    @end @*/
    if (!xmlhttp && typeof XMLHttpRequest!='undefined') {
     try {
      xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
     } catch (e) {
      xmlhttp=false
     }
    }
    function myXMLHttpRequest() {
      var xmlhttplocal;
      try {
        xmlhttplocal= new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP")
     } catch (e) {
      try {
        xmlhttplocal= new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP")
      } catch (E) {
        xmlhttplocal=false;
      }
     }

    if (!xmlhttplocal && typeof XMLHttpRequest!='undefined') {
     try {
      var xmlhttplocal = new XMLHttpRequest();
     } catch (e) {
      var xmlhttplocal=false;
      alert('couldn\'t create xmlhttp object');
     }
    }
    return(xmlhttplocal);
}

function sndReq(page,key,includesDir,changeDiv,parameterString) {
    var divToChange = document.getElementById(changeDiv); // the Div that the data will be put into

    // Place loading image in container DIV
    divToChange.innerHTML = '<div class="loading">Loading</div>';

    if (includesDir == 1){
        //Find Current Working Directory.  Use to find path to call other files from
        var myloc = window.location.href;
        var locarray = myloc.split("/");
        delete locarray[(locarray.length-1)];
        var arraytext = locarray.join("/");

        xmlhttp.open("POST","AJAXCaller.php",true);
        xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-type","application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
        xmlhttp.send(parameterString);

    } else {

    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = handleResponse(changeDiv);
    xmlhttp.send(null); 
}

function handleResponse(changeDiv) {
/* ======== If I remove the following line script halts ================*/
/* ======== If line stays here, script executes perfectly ==============*/
    alert('to changetext 1\n'+xmlhttp.responseText);
/* =========End of line removal issue =================================*/       
  if(xmlhttp.readyState == 4){

        if (xmlhttp.status == 200){

        var response = xmlhttp.responseText;

        var update = new Array();

            if(response.indexOf('|') != -1) {
                update = response.split('|');
                changeText(update[0], update[1]);
            } else {
                changeText(changeDiv, response);
            }

        } //End IF xmlhttp.status == 200


    }
}

function changeText( div2show, text ) {
    // Detect Browser
    var IE = (document.all) ? 1 : 0;
    var DOM = 0; 
    if (parseInt(navigator.appVersion) >=5) {DOM=1};

    // Grab the content from the requested "div" and show it in the "container"
    if (DOM) {
        var viewer = document.getElementById(div2show);
        viewer.innerHTML = text;
    }  else if(IE) {
        document.all[div2show].innerHTML = text;
    }
}

When I check my firefox error console, this error ONLY appears when I remove that alert as defined in the code:

Timestamp: 5/30/2012 5:07:55 PM
Error: b.data is undefined
Source File: http://cdn.sstatic.net/js/wmd.js?v=cfd2b283af83
Line: 92

I am an advanced PHP/mySQL developer, but have been trying hard to grasp AJAX/Javascript. Doing tutorials like mad. So please be descriptive in comments/answers so I can use them as a reference for learning...

Why would displaying an alert box alter code execution (for the better!) in any way?

NEW ERRORS - Google Chrome&Firefox Console (sigh...)

Uncaught Error: INVALID_STATE_ERR: DOM Exception 11
sndReqAJAX.js:89
element.onclick

Line 89 is the following (verified by Google Chrome Console)

xmlhttp.send(null);

Everything I find on the web refers to extremely complex issue regarding DOM objects not existing... This wouldn't apply here, would it?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, the problem. This is the line:

xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = handleResponse(changeDiv);

The reason this is wrong is that xmlhttp.onreadystatechange should be a function - you need to assign a function to the property, what you are doing is calling the function and assigning the return value to the property. This is not in itself a problem, as long as your function returns a function. Which it doesn't.

If you're used to working with PHP (especially if your used to working with PHP <5.3) you may not be used to this concept. Javascript has support for closures in a way that anyone who doesn't use them much will find confusing.

What the line needs to look like is this:

xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = handleResponse;

By appending (changeDiv) you are calling the function, whereas what you need to do is simply pass it, like you would any other value.

Now, where it gets complicated is that you want to pass an argument that is local to the scope of the calling function. There are a number of ways to handle this, but a cursory look at your code tells me that handleResponse() is not used anywhere else, so it would be better to define this as a closure and not litter the global scope with a named event handler. This also overcomes the variable scoping problem:

xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
  if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4) {
    if (xmlhttp.status == 200) {
      var response = xmlhttp.responseText;
      var update = []; // "new Array()" is baaaad
      if (response.indexOf('|') != -1) {
        update = response.split('|');
        changeText(update[0], update[1]);
      } else {
        changeText(changeDiv, response);
      }
    } //End IF xmlhttp.status == 200
  }
};

Replace the aforementioned offending line with that block of code, and remove the handleResponse() function definition, and that should solve the immediate problem. Now, as to why the alert() "fixes" your original code - this is a little hard to explain, but I shall have a go... give me a minute to inspect the code properly


Attempt at a full and comprehensible explanation abandoned. If anyone wants one, post a comment and I'll have another go at it when I've had some sleep...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the great explanation. I have heard closures referenced, but until now was absolutely baffled by the terminology, and all web references I saw seem to assume that a person would know what they were, thanks! I will test now... –  MaurerPower May 30 '12 at 23:46
1  
A "closure" is a subset of the concept known as an "anonymous function". You can use them in PHP as well (since 5.3). In simple terms, one assigns a function to a variable instead of naming it. In Javascript this is actually one and the same thing, it's a very interesting in that respect. –  DaveRandom May 30 '12 at 23:49
1  
onreadystatechange is a way to assign a handler to the xmlhttp object's readystatechange event. Every time this fires (usually 4 times, hence the if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4) { check) the function that is assigned to that property is called. You could have simply remove the parenthesis and used the named function (functions can be passed around by name in the same way as variables in JS, technically they are variables in so much as anything is, in fact they are members of the window object - in a browser, at least)... –  DaveRandom May 30 '12 at 23:56
1  
OK, I'm really struggling to come up with an explanation of why the alert was "fixing" your code without it sounding like gibberish. Basically the alert box was halting the execution of the current "thread" of Javascript code (there are no threads in Javascript) allowing the HTTP request to finish, populating the variables that needed data for the handler to execute correctly. You see? Gibberish... –  DaveRandom May 31 '12 at 0:03
1  
And FYI, locarray.pop(); does exactly the same thing as delete locarray[(locarray.length-1)]; in a much cleaner way –  DaveRandom May 31 '12 at 20:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.