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EDIT: Apparently I had to declare char *first at the beginning of the pigLatin method and initialize it to &word[counter] later in the method. Anybody knows why this is? I'm using Visual Studio 2010.

I'm having trouble figuring out why this gives me a compile-time error. The code in question:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <conio.h>

char *pigLatin(char *word)
{
   if (word[0] == 'a' || word[0] == 'e' || word[0] == 'i'
           || word[0] == 'o' || word[0] == 'u')
   {
       char yay[] = "yay";
       strcat(word, yay);
       return word;
   }
   else
   {
       int length = strlen(word);
       int counter = 0;
       char addOn[] = "";
       char remainder[] = "";
       char yay[] = "yay";
       printf("%s", yay);

       char *first = &word[counter]; 
       printf("%c", *first); // error is here, don't know why it doesn't print
       return word;
   }
}


int main()
{
   char hello[] = "hello";
   pigLatin(hello);
   printf("%s", hello);
   getch();
   return (0);
}

1>------ Build started: Project: Program_One, Configuration: Release Win32 ------

1> programone.c

1>programone.c(12): warning C4996: 'strcat': This function or variable may be unsafe. Consider using strcat_s instead. To disable deprecation, use _CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS. See online help for details.

1>programone.c(24): error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'

1>programone.c(25): error C2065: 'first' : undeclared identifier

1>programone.c(25): error C2100: illegal indirection

========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

I don't see why my pointer to the first character of the array "hello" isn't printing correctly.

Thanks in advance !

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2  
If you turn the warning level up on your compiler, you should find that this won't compile (or you should at least get warning messages). –  Oli Charlesworth May 30 '12 at 23:36
    
Shouldn't be &word[counter]? –  BeemerGuy May 30 '12 at 23:37
    
@OliCharlesworth: That's what I've been getting. The specific errors are: 1>programone.c(23): error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type' 1>programone.c(24): error C2065: 'first' : undeclared identifier 1>programone.c(24): error C2100: illegal indirection –  kkSlider May 30 '12 at 23:38
    
@BeemerGuy.net: I tried that but I still get a build error. –  kkSlider May 30 '12 at 23:39
    
@kkSlider: really? works for me –  Mooing Duck May 30 '12 at 23:52
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3 Answers

You are not assigning your pointer variable to point at the address of the first character. You are assigning the value of the character itself to the pointer variable, which is why the compiler errors.

You need to change this line:

char *first = word[counter]; 

To this:

char *first = &word[counter]; 

Or, just do this instead:

char *pigLatin(char *word)   
{   
    int counter = 0;   
    printf("%c", word[counter]);
    return word;   
}   

Update: even if the code did compile, it is dangerous. The compiler warning about strcat() is valid. You have not allocated enough memory to append "yay" to the input word if it starts with a vowel. To really make this code safer, you should use the std::string class instead of raw pointers:

#include <conio.h> 
#include <string> 

std::string pigLatin(const std::string &word) 
{ 
    switch( word[0] )
    {
        case 'a':
        case 'e':
        case 'i':
        case 'o':
        case 'u': 
            return word + "yay"; 
    }

    int length = word.length(); 
    int counter = 0; 
    //...

    printf("%c", word[counter]);
    return word; 
} 

int main() 
{ 
   std::string word = pigLatin("hello");
   printf("%s", hello.c_str()); 
   getch(); 
   return 0; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I do that and get these errors: >programone.c(23): error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type' 1>programone.c(24): error C2065: 'first' : undeclared identifier 1>programone.c(24): error C2100: illegal indirection –  kkSlider May 30 '12 at 23:50
    
@kkSlider: try this code: ideone.com/nY6f4, which is the result of making the change Remy says to your code. And also removing the DOS-specific lines, just to get it to compile on ideone, but they should have nothing to do with the error messages you report. –  Steve Jessop May 30 '12 at 23:55
1  
@kkSlider: Then you've made another mistake that's not shown in your sample code above. If I apply either of these suggestions to your original code, it compiles and runs correctly with MSVC++ 2010. –  Adrian McCarthy May 30 '12 at 23:57
    
@SteveJessop Yeah that does work fine. I'm going to edit my original post and put the entire code with errors. –  kkSlider May 31 '12 at 0:01
1  
@kkSlider: stupid C89, all variable definitions in a block must precede all statements. In some sense you "shouldn't" be using MS compilers for C: MS doesn't encourage it. Modern compilers are on C99 and thinking about C11. –  Steve Jessop May 31 '12 at 0:33
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This line here:

char *first = word[counter]; 

Should be this one instead:

char *first = &word[counter];

Due to you pointing at a value where the pointer targets, instead of the memory address itself, so to get the actual value you need the ampersand sign in front of the call to the array.

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You are currently telling the compiler to point first to the value of word[counter] which means it's pointing at somewhere strange in memory. You want to be pointing at the first element of the array so you need to replace:

char *first = word[counter];

with:

char *first = &word[counter];

or:

char *first = word;

Edit - The compiler error you mention in your comments relates to lines 23 & 24 of your source code. There are less than 23 lines in the example you posted above. The eror must therefore be in some extra code you've not posted here...

Edit2 - With a couple of minor adjustments, your code looks like it works to me: http://codepad.org/73BKMSgv

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Yeah I stripped my original code down to where the error was occurring so that viewers wouldn't need to see extraneous code. Now I learned that was a bad idea and fixed my original post. –  kkSlider May 31 '12 at 0:09
    
I think I'm using an older version of the C compiler because it still gives me a compiler error unless I declare my variables at the beginning of the method. I'm using a recent version of Visual Studio (2010), so I don't see why this problem is occurring. –  kkSlider May 31 '12 at 2:26
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