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they do same thing but i would like to know if is there some difference, i mean about performance...

TB1: tb1_id -> PK ...

TB2: tb1_id -> FK ...

select columns ... from tb1 a left join tb2 b
    on a.tb1_id=b.tb1_id and b.uid=xxxxxxx where a.tb1_id=yyy limit 1

select columns ... from tb1 a left join tb2 b
    on a.tb1_id=b.tb1_id where a.tb1_id=yyy and b.uid=xxxxxxx limit 1

thanks.

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4 Answers 4

Simplifying things a little bit you can think that your JOINs are evaluated first and then the WHEREs filters are applied. Using this formula:

1) Your first query will return all records from table a and corresponding records from table b (if exist, otherwise a set of NULLs) that have a matching tb1_id and a certain value in the uid field. The resulting set will then be filtered to only have records with a.tb1_id=yyy and the first record returned to the client.

2) Your second query will return all records from table a and corresponding records from table b (if exist, otherwise a set of NULLs) that have a matching tb1_id. The resulting set will be filtered out to only have records that have a certain value in a.tb1_id as well as a certain value in b.uid. The last part is important. This particular condition will discard all those records from table a that didn't have a matching set in b simply because NULL != xxxxxxx. Essentially, you don't mix a LEFT JOIN with a "hard" condition in WHERE. When you do so you immediately convert your OUTER join to an INNER one. The first record of the remaining set will be returned to the client.

That said, it may just so happen that in your case you might get the same result. Coincidentally. You don't have an ORDER BY in your queries so the order of records returned is up to the database engine (you are better off thinking it's not deterministic and can't be relied on, it just very likely is so anyway) and it just may so happen that the first record returned by both queries is the one matching all the conditions - has the tb1_id match in a and b as well as the xxxxxxx in the b.uid.

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After not noticing the 'LEFT' part of the JOIN, I doubted my original answer. After some quick research I have revised my answer.

This article explains things in detail, showing that the queries are actually handled differently.

This is shown with an example from the article below.

mysql> SELECT * FROM product LEFT JOIN product_details
   ON (product.id = product_details.id)
   AND product_details.id=2;
+----+--------+------+--------+-------+
| id | amount | id   | weight | exist |
+----+--------+------+--------+-------+
|  1 |    100 | NULL |   NULL |  NULL |
|  2 |    200 |    2 |     22 |     0 |
|  3 |    300 | NULL |   NULL |  NULL |
|  4 |    400 | NULL |   NULL |  NULL |
+----+--------+------+--------+-------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT * FROM product LEFT JOIN product_details
   ON (product.id = product_details.id)
   WHERE product_details.id=2;
+----+--------+----+--------+-------+
| id | amount | id | weight | exist |
+----+--------+----+--------+-------+
|  2 |    200 |  2 |     22 |     0 |
+----+--------+----+--------+-------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)
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They are not the same. See the answer provided by @Pavel_Veller This is just in support of his answer. Run on Postgres:

create table tb1( tb1_id int );
create table tb2( tb1_id int, uid int );

insert into tb1 values( 1 );

insert into tb2 values( 1, 0 );

select a.tb1_id
  from tb1 a left join tb2 b on a.tb1_id = b.tb1_id and b.uid = 3
  where a.tb1_id = 1;

select a.tb1_id
  from tb1 a left join tb2 b on a.tb1_id = b.tb1_id
  where a.tb1_id = 1
    and b.uid = 3;

Results:

postgres=#     select a.tb1_id
postgres-#       from tb1 a left join tb2 b on a.tb1_id = b.tb1_id and b.uid = 3
postgres-#       where a.tb1_id = 1;
 tb1_id
--------
      1
(1 row)


postgres=#     select a.tb1_id
postgres-#       from tb1 a left join tb2 b on a.tb1_id = b.tb1_id
postgres-#       where a.tb1_id = 1
postgres-#         and b.uid = 3;
 tb1_id
--------
(0 rows)
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these 2 queries don't do the same at all, the first one might not return any rows from b, while the second one won't return any from a nor b if there's no valid join with b.

Mysql interpretes the "=" in the where clause as if it were an INNER join (it is NOT a join, but it is used the same way in this case)

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