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(For a concrete compiler/platform context take GCC 4.7 and Ubuntu 12.04 on x86_64)

Given some function f:

void f(int x, int y);

int nx = ...;
int ny = ...;

One way to iterate over every value (x,y) from (0,0) to (nx,ny) is:

for (int x = 0; x < nx; x++)
    for (int y = 0; y < ny; y++)
        f(x,y);

Let this compile to some generated code Q1.

We will write a function g such that:

for (auto it : g(Z))
    f(it.x, it.y);

compiles to code Q2.

Is it possible to write g such that Q2 is as efficient as Q1? If yes, how? If not, what is the closest we can get?

You may change auto to auto& or auto&& if it helps.

You may also change it.x to it.x(), and it.y to it.y(), if it helps.

(Recall that the expansion of range-based for is just an iterator-like type of your choosing: C++11: The range-based for statement: "range-init" lifetime?)

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2  
Removed [c] tag, there is no range-for in C, same goes for auto as a deducing declaration type. Also, this isn't really specific to Linux, so I removed that tag too. –  Xeo May 31 '12 at 2:42
    
While you might be able to get to something close in performance to the original loop, chances are that it is going to be at least marginally slower (more complex code implies harder work for the compiler to optimize, and there are going to be extra objects and such. What is the problem with the simple double loop? (Also note the simplest trivial approach: for (int i = 0; i < nx*ny; ++i) f( i%nx, i/nx ); -- again marginally slower than the original –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 31 '12 at 3:02
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Actually mod and div are typically implemented with an IDIV instruction, which is about 100 times slower than an increment or a compare. –  Andrew Tomazos May 31 '12 at 10:27
    
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling: Again, what is the cost of 'f'? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 31 '12 at 13:33
1  
The question is rather absurd (changing a common simple loop into something uncommon) and you are asking for 'similar performance'. The relative cost of the solution with respect to the overall operation will make the performance similar or unsimilar. If f is a couple of cycles, no solution will be similar in performance (a single extra cycle might have a huge impact on the overall loop), but if f takes seconds, all solutions for the loop will have similar performance (1 or 100 cycles will have no impact on the cost of the whole loop) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 31 '12 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it possible to write g such that Q2 is as efficient as Q1? If yes, how? If not, what is the closest we can get?

Sure its possible, you just need to define iterators that increment in the same way as your for loop. From the top of my head:

class matrix_iterator
{
public:
    ...

    matrix_iterator& operator++()
    {
        if( ++y >= ny )
        {
            ++x;
            y = 0;
        }

        return *this;
    }

private:
    int nx, ny;
    int x, y;
};
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1  
Depending on the cost of f the extra cost of the iterator and the copy to the variable in the range-based for loop might be noticeable --Not complaining about the solution, but I just don't think that the question makes sense, and both answers provide a complex solution to a simple problem: just write the two ##### loops! :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 31 '12 at 3:06
1  
@David Rodríguez - dribeas: Really? Have you seen today's compilers? They can and do optimize out this kind of thing so that the generated code is equivalent. –  K-ballo May 31 '12 at 3:07
1  
I have seen todays compilers... and the effect will not be large, but if f is a light weight function it can have a (small) impact. Just as a generic question... std::bind( &f, x ) in different implementations: boost::bind compiled with g++ makes 4 copies of x, g++4.7 std::bind makes a single copy (what I would expect), VS2010 makes 7, yes 7!!! copies of x. I have seen what compilers do, and the fact is that for something as simple as this, it makes no sense to go overboard with a more complex, harder to maintain and potentially more expensive solution... just saying :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 31 '12 at 3:14

This code has the functionality that you want. I haven't verified it, but I suspect it will produce almost identical machine code (in an optimized compile) as the original loops.

struct iter {
    int x, y, ny;
    iter(int x, int y, int ny) : x(x), y(y), ny(ny) {}
    iter &operator++ () {
        if (++y >= ny)
        {
            y = 0;
            ++x;
        }
        return *this;
    }
    bool operator != (iter const &rhs) const {
        return y != rhs.y || x != rhs.x;
    }
};

struct container {
    iter endit;
    container(int nx, int ny) : endit(nx, ny, ny) {}
    iter begin() const { return iter(0,0,endit.ny); }
    iter const &end() const { return endit; }
};

container g(Z const &z) { return container(z.nx, z.ny); }

for ( auto it : g(Z) )
    f(it.x, it.y);
share|improve this answer
    
Where does the ny in container::begin come from? –  Xeo May 31 '12 at 2:52
    
Ah, oops, edited. –  SoapBox May 31 '12 at 2:53
    
Making endit const makes container pointlessly noncopyable. Make it private and non-const and container will have the exact same semantics + copyability. –  ildjarn May 31 '12 at 18:56
    
I don't that copyability is important for this particular example, but I changed it to non-const anyways. –  SoapBox May 31 '12 at 19:32
1  
The const member made it non-assignable not non-copyable. –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 2 '12 at 1:33

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