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When I build a Visual Studio project, the executable is written to the output directory specified in the projects Property Page.

I have a project that has some extra files (e.g., .ini file) that are used by the program.

How can I configure the project to copy the file to the output directory so that when the program runs, it has a copy of the other file in its CWD?

I checked the Property Page of the file and there was nothing useful other than an option to exclude it from the build (which is disabled), and the custom-build-tool command is empty (plus it is a plain-text file that does not need any processing).

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4 Answers 4

For copying a files to the output directory in VS2003 you could use Post-Build event:

  1. Right click on the project->Properties
  2. Common Properties->Build Events
  3. Set Post-Build Event Command Line to:

    xcopy /y $(ProjectDir)my_file.ini $(ProjectDir)$(OutDir)

  4. OK and build!

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1  
That works as well (though you don't need xcopy, copy works fine), but the catch is that it requires hard-coding the filename into the project’s build properties. Doing it the way I showed lets process each file separately and use macros for the filename. –  Synetech Jun 2 '12 at 17:06
    
It depends on which version of Visual Studio you are using. This person specifically said VS 2003, which I have a project in and this helped me. The settings are terrible in 2003 - you can't even specify anything on each file's properties such as "Copy to output directory". –  David Storfer Aug 5 '13 at 19:37
1  
if you want the file to be copied even when the project is up-to-date and doesn't require a build, add the file to the project. –  Jonathan Dec 6 '13 at 22:02

Please try select the file in Solution Explorer. Then you should be able to see its properties in Properties window (press F4 if it is not visible). You will find there two properties:

  • "Build Action" and
  • "Copy to Output Directory"

Set "Build Action" to "Content", and then - select an appropriate value for "Copy to Output Directory" setting.

File properties window with "Build Action" and "Copy to Output Directory" settings

File properties window with "Build Action" and "Copy to Output Directory" settings

If the way above doesn't work for you, please read this post "Copy to output directory issue with .inf file". And have a look at this one then "Visual Studio: default build action for non-default file-types"

Hope that hepls

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VS2003 does not seem to have that feature (for some reason). –  Synetech May 31 '12 at 6:43
    
This worked for me. Thanks –  Henry Ing-Simmons Jan 25 '14 at 3:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

While I was searching the file’s Property Page for a build-action field, I had a thought: set the custom build step to copy the file (manually). This turned out to be easier than I thought. I had figured it would require using cmd or other external executable (xcopy, robocopy, etc.), but that is not necessary.

I set the Custom Build Step as follows:

Command Line : copy $(InputFileName) $(OutDir)
Description  : Copying foobar...
Outputs      : $(InputFileName)

Setting the outputs field (correctly) was critical in order to prevent VS from always thinking the project is out of date and requiring to be rebuilt (I’m not certain if it needs to be prefixed with $(OutDir)\).

It is reflected in the Output window as such:

Copying foobar...
        1 file(s) copied.
Compiling resources...
Linking...
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You need the extra $(OutDir). Otherwise, in the rebuild/clean step it will throw away your source.

CommandLine : copy "$(SolutionDir)last-script.js" "$(TargetDir)Debug"

Outputs  : $(TargetDir)Debug\last-script.js
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