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Let's say I have some of links that I want to add a javascript action to:

<a class='test'>
<a class='test'>
<a class='test'>

When my page loads I give them all a click event:

$('.test').click(function(){
  alert("I've been clicked!")
});

but let's say afterward I add another element and I want to give it the same event. I can't do this:

$('.test').click(function(){
  alert("I've been clicked!")
});

because then the first 3 will have 2 events on them. What's the best way to deal with this?

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marked as duplicate by kapa May 22 at 12:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
actually what do you want to do? –  stay_hungry May 31 '12 at 4:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can bind the $.on to a parent element that will always exist in dom like this.

$(document).on('click','.test', function() {
            console.log('Test clicked');
        });

Note that: You can replace document with any parent of the element that will always exist in dom, and the closer the parent the better.

Simple event binding with click wont work as click bind the event handlers to elements that already exists in dom at the time of binding. And hence it doesn't work for elements dynamically added to dom later through Ajax or jQuery. For that purpose you have to use event delegation. And you can use $.on for that purpose.

Check documentation of $.on

You can use $.live but $live is depreciated. use $.on instead. Equivalent syntax of $.on for $.live and $.delegate which does the same thing

$(selector).live(events, data, handler);                // jQuery 1.3+
$(document).delegate(selector, events, data, handler);  // jQuery 1.4.3+
$(document).on(events, selector, data, handler);        // jQuery 1.7+

In this case event handler will be bound to document. And events will be delegated to target element by jQuery in this case test class.

UPDATE

I would suggest you to use $.on for all event handling purposes as all other methods routes through $.on and $.off method under the hood.

Check the definition of these functions from jQuery source v.1.7.2

bind: function( types, data, fn ) {
    return this.on( types, null, data, fn );
},
unbind: function( types, fn ) {
    return this.off( types, null, fn );
},

live: function( types, data, fn ) {
    jQuery( this.context ).on( types, this.selector, data, fn );
    return this;
},
die: function( types, fn ) {
    jQuery( this.context ).off( types, this.selector || "**", fn );
    return this;
},

delegate: function( selector, types, data, fn ) {
    return this.on( types, selector, data, fn );
},
undelegate: function( selector, types, fn ) {
    // ( namespace ) or ( selector, types [, fn] )
    return arguments.length == 1? this.off( selector, "**" ) : this.off( types, selector, fn );
} 

And that is true for these convenient events handlers too

blur focus focusin focusout load resize scroll unload click dblclick mousedown 
mouseup mousemove mouseover mouseout mouseenter mouseleave change select 
submit keydown keypress keyup error contextmenu

You can see all methods are using $.on and $.off themselves. So using $.on you can at least save a function call though which isn't that significant in most of the cases.

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So .live() is actually the same as .on()? –  Derek 朕會功夫 May 31 '12 at 4:50
    
Yeah but it's depreciated now. –  Joy May 31 '12 at 4:50
    
@Derek - .live() is the equivalent of binding .on() to the body element. It has to bubble a long way first, it's better to attach it to a nearer parent. –  ahren May 31 '12 at 4:51
    
@Joy - I think .click() is the same as .on(). So you are just giving back the same code as @pguardiario has in his example code. –  Derek 朕會功夫 May 31 '12 at 4:51
    
Click doesn't work for dynamically added elements. –  Joy May 31 '12 at 4:52

As your .test are appended via ajax, so you need delegate event on that, ordinary binding will not affect them. Delegate binding will applied to all elements existing in DOM and will add to DOM.

$('body').on('click', '.test', function() {
   // your code
});

Instead of body you can use the container of all .test which already belongs to DOM.

Get more about .on()

You can also use .delegate() like following:

$('#container').delegate('.test', 'click', function() {
   // your code
});
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If the elements are added dynamically to the page, look at the jQuery on event. And consider the following for example:

http://jsfiddle.net/n1ck/QQYq2/2/

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use on(), and attach it to their containing element.

$(".container").on("click", ".test", function(){
    alert("You clicked me!");   
});
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Because when you inject new content to the DOM (via ajax or javascript), The existing binding wont work .You have to either rebind the events or use jQuery on which will work for current elements and future elements

http://api.jquery.com/on/

So to fx this, change

$('.test').click(function(){
  alert("I've been clicked!")
});

to

$(document).on('click','.test',function(){
  alert("I've been clicked!")
});
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