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This works:

public override bool GetAppointments(CalendarModel calendar, DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate) {
    foreach (var googcal in _settings.Calendars.Where(googcal => googcal.Selected)) {
        var eventQuery = new EventQuery {
            Uri = new Uri(googcal.ProviderData),
            // Passed in startDate/endDate are inclusive
            StartTime = startDate.Date,
            EndTime = endDate.Date.AddDays(1).AddMilliseconds(-1)
        };
        var eventFeed = Service.Query(eventQuery);
        foreach (EventEntry appt in eventFeed.Entries) {
...
        }
    }
    return true;
}

This does not:

public override bool GetAppointments(CalendarModel calendar, DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate) {
    foreach (var googcal in _settings.Calendars.Where(googcal => googcal.Selected)) {
        var eventQuery = new EventQuery {
            // Passed in startDate/endDate are inclusive
            StartTime = startDate.Date,
            EndTime = endDate.Date.AddDays(1).AddMilliseconds(-1),
            Uri = new Uri(googcal.ProviderData)
        };
        var eventFeed = Service.Query(eventQuery);
        foreach (EventEntry appt in eventFeed.Entries) {
...
        }
    }
    return true;
}

In the first case Event.Query.StartTime and EndTime are set correctly, as expected.

In the second case they are uninitialized (1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM).

The only difference is the order of the properties in the object initializer.

For grins, I did the order like this:

// Passed in startDate/endDate are inclusive
StartTime = startDate.Date,
Uri = new Uri(googcal.ProviderData),
EndTime = endDate.Date.AddDays(1).AddMilliseconds(-1)

and sure enough EndTime is correct, but StartTime is uninitalized.

This makes no sense to me. How could it be?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe problem is somewhere else. Order doesn't affect my object initialization. – Saeed Neamati May 31 '12 at 5:18

Object initializers just set properties. Any side-effects of setting one property before another will be visible just as if you'd written it out longhand:

var tmp = new EventQuery();
tmp.StartTime = startDate.Date;
tmp.EndTime = endDate.Date.AddDays(1).AddMilliseconds(-1);
tmp.Uri = new Uri(googcal.ProviderData);
var eventQuery = tmp;

In this case, I suspect that some internal state is added to by setting StartTime/EndTime but reset by setting Uri.

EDIT: Okay, I've now found the relevant code.

EventQuery derives from FeedQuery. Setting the Uri on FeedQuery calls ParseUri which in turn sets all of the internal properties.

Basically, this sort of thing will always happen when you have inter-related properties. Imagine you had a Size property of a type which reflected a width and a height which could also be set independently - you'd be able to write:

var foo = new Foo {
    Width = 100,
    Size = new Size(200, 50),
    Height = 20
};

and end up with a size of 200x20. Basically it all makes sense when you understand that Uri is a property representing the complete query URI, not just the stem.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, your suspicion is correct Jon. See the answer I just posted. – tig May 31 '12 at 5:22

It is amazing how the act of asking a question on Stack Overflow can help you understand what is going on. I'm leaving this question here so that anyone else who comes across this will know what's going on...I can't be the only person who will have this problem.

In the Google Calendar API V2, the .NET library, which I am using here has what I think is a bug in the EventQuery class.

Specifically, setting Uri has side-effects on the object. Specifically, it causes the StartTime and EndTime properties to be initialized.

I've fixed my code by doing this:

var eventQuery = new EventQuery(googcal.ProviderData) {
    StartTime = startDate.Date, 
    EndTime = endDate.Date.AddDays(1).AddMilliseconds(-1)
};

IOW, setting the Uri in the constructor.

share|improve this answer
1  
It would have helped if you'd said you were using v2 before - I've been looking through the v3 code. – Jon Skeet May 31 '12 at 5:23
    
Sorry! Next time. – tig May 31 '12 at 5:23
    
You can set it in the constructor - or you could just set it before setting the other properties, as per your first example. I'd probably pass it into the constructor though. I don't think it's a bug per se, although it could be more clearly documented. – Jon Skeet May 31 '12 at 5:34
    
It's not a bug, you are just using it incorrectly. You set either Uri or the rest of properties. Uri is not ever stored. It gets broken down to components and each time it's requested it's reassembled back. So if you set URI first and then you change StartTime and EndTime when you query URI again it will be different. It will get reassembled from components two of which are StartTime and EndTime you just provided. – zespri May 31 '12 at 5:34

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