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#include<stdio.h>

main()
{
    int a[]={10,20,30,40,50};
    char *p;
    int i;

    p=(char*)a;
    for(i=0;i<8;i++)
    {
        printf("%d    %u\n",*p,p);
        p++;
    }
    return 0;
}

Please explain the behavior that how array is stored in memory?

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closed as too localized by Michael Petrotta, NPE, paxdiablo, RedX, kapa May 31 '12 at 6:50

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Based on this and a previous question, you should find a good C book. –  Blastfurnace May 31 '12 at 6:12
    
Sequentially allocated block of memory, when it's array of integers it will allocate 4 bytes for each element or depending on the system, google it dude, SOF is not for that kind of questions. –  Ahmed Jolani May 31 '12 at 6:13
    
tag homework missing? –  RedX May 31 '12 at 6:35
    
Strictly speaking, p=(char*)a; is undefined behavior. The code will be dependent on endianess. –  Lundin May 31 '12 at 6:59

1 Answer 1

Your array is stored in one continuous block of memory:

index:      0       |       1       |      2       |      3        |      4
bytes: 0  1  2  3   |  4  5  6  7   |  8  9 10 11  |  12 13 14 15  | 16 17 18 19
values:    10       |      20       |      30      |     40        |      50

These questions will help you:
Address of first element in static declaration of array
How does this pointer arithmetic work?

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