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My SQL query is spitting out 3000 queries when it should be spitting out 20, I'm using Oracle.

Here are the tables:

Item (itemNumber, itemName, itemDescription, itemValue, itemLocation, 
categoryID, sellerUsername)   

Auction (auctionNumber, currency, startDateTime, endDateTime, shippingTerms, 
startBidAmount, reserveAmount, bidIncrementAmount, noOfItems, itemSold, 
itemNumber feedbackDateAndTime, rating, comments, paymentDate, paymentid)

Bid (bidderUsername, auctionNumber, bidDateTime,bidAmount)

and my query

SELECT
   i.itemname,
   i.itemdescription,
   i.itemvalue,
   CASE
       WHEN i.itemnumber=a.itemnumber and a.itemSold='y' THEN 'Sold'
       WHEN a.auctionnumber != b.auctionnumber and TO_CHAR(sysdate,'DD-MON-YY')>endDateTime THEN 'No Bids on that closed auction'
       WHEN TO_CHAR(sysdate,'DD-MON-YY')<a.endDatetime and a.auctionnumber=b.auctionnumber 
                 and reserveamount>(
                 SELECT b.bidAmount
                 FROM dbf12.bid b, dbf12.auction a               
                 WHERE a.auctionnumber=b.auctionnumber 
                 GROUP BY b.bidAmount
                 HAVING b.bidAmount= max(b.bidAmount)) THEN 'No Bids that meets the reserve'
        ELSE 'Auction Still Open'
   END 
FROM 
   dbf12.item i, dbf12.auction a, dbf12.bid b;
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you forgot the join criteria between dbf12.item, dbf12.auction, and dbf12.bid. This makes it essentially a cross product of the three tables, joining every row in each to every row in all the others.

Try something like this:

SELECT
   i.itemname,
   i.itemdescription,
   i.itemvalue,
   CASE
       WHEN i.itemnumber=a.itemnumber and a.itemSold='y' THEN 'Sold'
       WHEN a.auctionnumber != b.auctionnumber and TO_CHAR(sysdate,'DD-MON-YY')>endDateTime THEN 'No Bids on that closed auction'
       WHEN TO_CHAR(sysdate,'DD-MON-YY')<a.endDatetime and a.auctionnumber=b.auctionnumber 
                 and reserveamount>(
                 SELECT b.bidAmount
                 FROM dbf12.bid b, dbf12.auction a               
                 WHERE a.auctionnumber=b.auctionnumber 
                 GROUP BY b.bidAmount
                 HAVING b.bidAmount= max(b.bidAmount)) THEN 'No Bids that meets the reserve'
        ELSE 'Auction Still Open'
   END 
FROM 
   dbf12.item i, dbf12.auction a, dbf12.bid b
    WHERE i.itemnumber = a.itemnumber and b.actionnumber = a.auctionnumber

You can also say something like:

SELECT
   i.itemname,
   i.itemdescription,
   i.itemvalue,
   CASE
       WHEN i.itemnumber=a.itemnumber and a.itemSold='y' THEN 'Sold'
       WHEN a.auctionnumber != b.auctionnumber and TO_CHAR(sysdate,'DD-MON-YY')>endDateTime THEN 'No Bids on that closed auction'
       WHEN TO_CHAR(sysdate,'DD-MON-YY')<a.endDatetime and a.auctionnumber=b.auctionnumber 
                 and reserveamount>(
                 SELECT b.bidAmount
                 FROM dbf12.bid b, dbf12.auction a               
                 WHERE a.auctionnumber=b.auctionnumber 
                 GROUP BY b.bidAmount
                 HAVING b.bidAmount= max(b.bidAmount)) THEN 'No Bids that meets the reserve'
        ELSE 'Auction Still Open'
   END 
    from db12.item i
        inner join dbf12.auction a on a.itemnumber = i.itemnumber
        inner join dbf12.bid b on b.auctionnumber = a.auctionnumber
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where would I add the WHERE statement? –  user1393064 May 31 '12 at 6:20
    
The where clause would go at the very end of your query after the from clause –  Mark Roberts May 31 '12 at 6:21
    
there where statement throws 3000+ rows, the inner join throws 0 rows. it should be putting out 20 rows –  user1393064 May 31 '12 at 6:32
    
As the original query is structured, an item must have at least one auction and an auction must at least one bid in order to be considered in the result set. If a particular criteria is optional you might make the inner join on that a left outer join instead. This signals the database that it's ok for the join to fail on that row. –  Mark Roberts May 31 '12 at 6:39
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