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Using Perl, I want to print only the repeating (duplicate) values in each list. The values should appear at least 2 times (2 or more times). Each list (row) should be considered separately.

For example, given the input:

abc 51082 6457 31072 5575 5488 4842 16567 151

cde 5575 3674 8150  5575 3674 8150

fgh 5737 6887 48278 3674 34399 3674 8150

I want the following output:

abc 
cde 5575 3674 8150
fgh 3674

I wrote the following source code, but it's not giving the correct output:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

open FH, "input.txt";
@a=<FH>;

my %count_of;

foreach $tmp (@a) 
{
    foreach $word (split /\s/, $tmp) 
    {
        $count_of{$word}++;

        if ($count_of{$word} >=2)
        {
            print "$word\n";
        }
    }
}

exit;

Could someone please guide me on what changes need to be made to the code? Thank you!

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1  
what exactly error are you getting? –  Nikhil Jain May 31 '12 at 6:25
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here a working version. Look at the comments in the code to understand the corrections

#!/usr/bin/perl

# always use strict and warnings: this will help you to find errors
use warnings;
use strict;

open FH, 'input.txt';

# always declare variables
my @a=<FH>;

# you should close file handles
close FH;

# declare $tmp
foreach my $tmp (@a) {

    # you need to process the first element differently since you
    # want to always print it
    my @row = split /\s/, $tmp;

    # you should check for empty rows
    if (@row == 0) {
        # empty row
        next;
    }

    # removes the first element
    my $header = shift @row;

    # the first element is always printed
    print $header;

    # this should be local otherwise you are counting globally
    # a new declaration will give you a new hash
    my %count_of;

    # declare $word
    foreach my $word ( @row ) {

        # you should not increment an undefined variable
        if ( $count_of{$word} ) {
            $count_of{$word} = 1;
        } else {
            $count_of{$word}++;
        }

        # just print the second time you see the word
        if ( $count_of{$word} == 2) {
            print " $word";
        }

    }

    print "\n";

}

# it is good practice to return true at the end of a script (no need to exit)
1;

This produces:

abc
cde 5575 3674 8150
fgh 3674
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this looks quite right. Won't this print duplicates where there are more than two duplicates? For example, if there are three of the same number won't this print that number twice? –  mttrb May 31 '12 at 6:40
    
@mttrb: corrected –  Matteo May 31 '12 at 6:42
    
That looks better :) –  mttrb May 31 '12 at 7:21
1  
@zock look also at the other solutions. My example is just a correction of your example but there are other ways to achieve the same goal. –  Matteo May 31 '12 at 7:38
1  
@zock you can also try Perl::Critic (a tool to analyze your code) –  Matteo May 31 '12 at 7:39
show 1 more comment

grep in combination with a hash for keeping track of seen values is a good fit for these kinds of problems:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $file = "input.txt";
open my $fh, "<", "$file" or die "Unable to open $file: $!\n";

while (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    my ($key, @values) = split or next; # skip empty rows
    my (%seen, @dupl);
    @dupl = grep $seen{$_}++ == 1, @values;
    print "$key @dupl\n";
}

Output:

abc 
cde 5575 3674 8150
fgh 3674

Note that or (as opposed to ||) is vital in both conditions. Additionally you should always check the result of your attempt to open a file, use strict; and preferably replace -w with use warnings; for portability. It's also unnecessary to slurp your file when you're going to be processing it line by line anyway.

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If input list contains more than 2 equal values, they will be duplicated in output, too. –  Alan May 31 '12 at 7:14
    
@Alan: I think I just beat you to it. ;) –  flesk May 31 '12 at 7:15
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#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    my ($name, @inp) = split /\s+/ or next;
    my %counts;
    for (@inp) { $counts{$_}++ }
    print join (' ', $name, map { $counts{$_} > 1 ? $_ : () } keys %counts), "\n";
}
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