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In IE9, I get the following error in console:

SCRIPT1002: Syntax error subdomain.domain.com, line 2 character 1

The line that created this error is:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:fb="http://www.facebook.com/2008/fbml" dir="ltr" lang="en-US">

I don't get this error in Chrome.

I'm not able to precisely figure out what's gone wrong. I guess having more than one xmlns attributes in the html tag could be creating problem. I searched for this, but couldn't get the information. Please help.

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2  
Are you sure, the error occurs on that line? Try to give more than that line or a link to the site. –  Bastian Rang May 31 '12 at 6:29
    
Hi Bastian, Here's the link: living.tend.com IE 9 shows an error in its console. –  Aniket Suryavanshi Jun 1 '12 at 14:47

2 Answers 2

To answer your question: For sure it can have more than one namespace attribute if it defines different namespaces! Like you do with xmlns:fb.

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but why it does not work in IE as the questin ! –  shareef May 31 '12 at 7:59
    
@shareef - The point is that it does work, and that you have misinterpreted the error message. The error is occurring in a JavasScript file, and you need to post sufficient code and error information for us to determine what the problem actually is. –  Alohci May 31 '12 at 9:02
    
Hi Alohci, you can see the error I've described on living.tend.com . –  Aniket Suryavanshi Jun 7 '12 at 6:23

yes it can have more than one ...i have used it in fb:api

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Ok ... so the xmlns attribute isn't causing the error. Then what could be wrong in the source code I shared in the question above? –  Aniket Suryavanshi Jun 1 '12 at 5:48

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