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I'm doing an assignment in which I have to move a simulated robot across the screen in a loop - I've got that part down, however, between loops, I also have to print the percentage of area covered with each movement - that's my issue.

I googled a bit and even found someone with the same problem, however, I'm not sure if I'm doing it properly.

This code was offered:

percent_complete = 0

for i in range(5):
    percent_complete += 20
    print('{}% complete'.format(percent_complete))

However, after an error, further googling revealed that only worked with certain versions

so I used this code:

percent_complete = 0

for i in range(5):
        percent_complete += 20
        print '% complete' % (percent_complete)

And, at the very least, it now executes the code, however, the output when printing is the following:

Here we go!
hello
omplete
hello
(omplete
hello
<omplete
hello
Pomplete
hello
domplete

What is the cause of this? I assume because one of the codes had to be edited, the other parts do as well, but I'm not sure what needs to be done.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
for i in range(5):
    percent_complete += 20
    print '%d complete' % (percent_complete)

You were missing the d specifier.

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The first version only works in Python 3 because it uses print as a function. You're probably looking for the following:

percent_complete = 0
for i in xrange(5):
    percent_complete += 20
    print '{0} complete'.format(percent_complete)

Your other code doesn't do what you intend to do because it now display the number as a string. What you want is that the number is properly converted to a string first and then displayed in the string. The function format does that for you.

You can also use Ansari's approach which explicitly specifies that percent_complete is a number (with the d specifier).

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... and in 2.7. –  glglgl May 31 '12 at 8:32

To add to/correct above answers:

The reason your first example didn't work isn't because print isn't a function, but because you left out the argument specifier. Try print('{0}% complete'.format(percent_complete)). The 0 inside the brackets is the crucial factor there.

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1  
... not in newest versions. –  glglgl May 31 '12 at 8:32
1  
Yes, but the OP mentioned that the plain {} version only worked "in certain versions", so presumably it didn't work in the version the OP tried (or else it would have, well, worked). –  BrenBarn May 31 '12 at 17:08

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