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Of the five primitive JavaScript data types (string, number, boolean, null and undefined), the first three have associated constructors:

new String("Hello!")
new Number(40)
new Boolean(true)

The constructed objects are wrappers for the object literals. In particular, new String("Hello!") === "Hello!" evaluates to false.

Are there a similar constructors for the null and undefined primitive data types that produce object wrappers different from the corresponding object literal?

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I don't think you can have a constructor for undefined –  Gavriel May 31 '12 at 6:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, there are not, and it wouldn't make sense considering the "values" they represent.

Ignore the fact that typeof null === 'object'

According to MDN:

JavaScript automatically converts primitives and String objects, so that it's
possible to use String object methods for primitive strings.

The interpreter just does some magical auto-wrapping of primitive in classes if you call a method that affects the primitive, like charAt.

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When people ask "Why is typeof null == 'object' and I say "because ECMA-262 says so" I get criticised. But I have no other explanation. –  RobG May 31 '12 at 7:11

primitive types dont have constructors. string, number and boolean have Object wrappers that wrap the primitive type. Thats why the String Object in js is not the same as a "" as you stated. The null and undefined primitive types dont have an associated Object constructor.

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While all Functions are Objects, not all Objects can be constructors. Only Function objects can be constructors. –  RobG May 31 '12 at 7:08

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