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I have built a small (and 3 methods only!) api for myself, and I want to be able to call it like how you would call a method in Powerbot (A Runescape botting tool (I use it, but for programming purposes, not for actual cheating purposes)), without creating an Object of the file you'd require. How would i be able to do this?

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1  
Make the methods static - stackoverflow.com/questions/3963983/… –  fiction May 31 '12 at 7:00
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if you use the static keyword when importing your class, you can use it's methods as if they belong to the class you're importing them to

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/language/static-import.html

and of course you're "api methods" need to be static as well

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The prerequisite of this is declaring the desired class members static. –  Péter Török May 31 '12 at 7:04
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You will need to create static methods, so you will need to do something like so:

public class A
{
    public static void foo()
    {
        ...
    }
}

And then, you can call them like so:

public class B
{
    ...
    A.foo();
}

Note however that static methods need to be self contained.

EDIT: As recommended in one of the answers below, you can make it work like so:

package samples.examples
public class Test
{
    public static void A()
    {
        ...
    }
}

And then do this:

import static sample.examples.Test.A;

public class Test2
{
    ...
    A();
}
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What i'm asking is, is it possible to be able to call them, without having any kind of declaration? Like using the "A.foo();" Is it possible to just call it like foo();? –  Nathan Kreider May 31 '12 at 8:33
    
@Nathan: To just call foo() you will need to place it in the same class. –  npinti May 31 '12 at 8:42
    
So there's no way at all to get rid of the class declaration? –  Nathan Kreider May 31 '12 at 8:43
    
@NathanKreider: What you are after seems after all possible. I have ammended my answer. –  npinti May 31 '12 at 8:48
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