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I'm trying to understand about nested classes in C#. I understand that a nested class is a class that is defined within another class, what I don't get is why I would ever need to do this.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, slfan, iMat, cHao, Jeff B Feb 25 '13 at 19:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I wonder how many other questions have this exact same subject line? Come on, Dan! What about C# Nested Classes? –  John Saunders Jul 4 '09 at 21:51
1  
John, i agree that it was asked before, but both a search on "C# Nested Classes" and the Related panel on the right contain no direct duplicates. Blame it on SO search :-{ –  Henk Holterman Jul 4 '09 at 23:03
2  
You're right. There's a lot about them, but not "why". Closest I found was stackoverflow.com/questions/454218/…, and you'd have to know that inner and nested meant the same thing. Maybe it's not search, but maybe this is actually the first at this level. –  John Saunders Jul 4 '09 at 23:15

9 Answers 9

A pattern that I particularly like is to combine nested classes with the factory pattern:

public abstract class BankAccount
{
  private BankAccount() {} // prevent third-party subclassing.
  private sealed class SavingsAccount : BankAccount { ... }
  private sealed class ChequingAccount : BankAccount { ... }
  public static BankAccount MakeSavingAccount() { ... }
  public static BankAccount MakeChequingAccount() { ... }
}

By nesting the classes like this, I make it impossible for third parties to create their own subclasses. I have complete control over all the code that runs in any bankaccount object. And all my subclasses can share implementation details via the base class.

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4  
Do MakeSavingAccount() and MakeChequingAccount() need to be static? –  Jonathon Reinhart Apr 10 '12 at 23:25
2  
@JonathonReinhart, I think it wouldn't make sense otherwise. First, it would mean you need BankAccount to make BankAccount: how do you get the first BankAccount? Second, I don't see any logic in that: why should creating a BankAccount require you to first have a BankAccount? –  svick Apr 11 '12 at 12:41
1  
@svick, exactly why I asked the question. And it appears to have been fixed in the answer. –  Jonathon Reinhart Apr 11 '12 at 17:04
    
@JonathonReinhart, sorry, I didn't notice the edit to the answer after your comment, so I misunderstood what you mean. –  svick Apr 11 '12 at 17:08
    
That was a typo; thanks for the note! –  Eric Lippert Apr 11 '12 at 18:00

The purpose is typically just to restrict the scope of the nested class. Nested classes compared to normal classes have the additional possibility of the private modifier (as well as protected of course).

Basically, if you only need to use this class from within the "parent" class (in terms of scope), then it is usually appropiate to define it as a nested class. If this class might need to be used from without the assembly/library, then it is usually more convenient to the user to define it as a separate (sibling) class, whether or not there is any conceptual relationship between the two classes. Even though it is technically possible to create a public class nested within a public parent class, this is in my opinion rarely an appropiate thing to implement.

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24  
In fact, the .NET Framework Guidelines explicitly recommend against creating public nested classes. –  Mark Seemann Jul 4 '09 at 22:43
    
@Mark: I wasn't aware of that, but it definitely makes sense. They are usually only appropiate as private/protected or in the rare case internal (when acesss from without the class isn't common). –  Noldorin Jul 4 '09 at 22:51
    
Mark, got a link? –  Henk Holterman Jul 4 '09 at 22:52
1  
One more example that MS doesn't adhere to its own recommendation: Just see System.Windows.Forms.ListView nested classes! –  Mehrdad Afshari Jul 5 '09 at 2:24
3  
Better MSDN article on this - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229027.aspx –  akjoshi Dec 21 '11 at 12:08

A nested class can have private, protected and protected internal access modifiers along with public and internal.

For example, you are implementing the GetEnumerator() method that returns an IEnumerator<T> object. The consumers wouldn't care about the actual type of the object. All they know about it is that it implements that interface. The class you want to return doesn't have any direct use. You can declare that class as a private nested class and return an instance of it (this is actually how the C# compiler implements iterators):

class MyUselessList : IEnumerable<int> {
    // ...
    private List<int> internalList;
    private class UselessListEnumerator : IEnumerator<int> {
        private MyUselessList obj;
        public UselessListEnumerator(MyUselessList o) {
           obj = o;
        }
        private int currentIndex = -1;
        public int Current {
           get { return obj.internalList[currentIndex]; }
        }
        public bool MoveNext() { 
           return ++currentIndex < obj.internalList.Count;
        }
    }
    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator() {
        return new UselessListEnumerator(this);
    }
}
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1  
Mehrdad: could you edit your answer to include an example of an IEnumerable class defining its enumerator type? I'd do it, but it belongs with your answer or Reed's. –  John Saunders Jul 4 '09 at 23:18
    
John: Done. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jul 5 '09 at 0:32
    
Thanks. Unfortunately can't upvote you again! –  John Saunders Jul 5 '09 at 0:34
    
Additionally, I find the internal working of how a foreach works absolutely amazing. Thanks! –  Karthik Feb 28 '12 at 7:07

what I don't get is why I would ever need to do this

I think you never need to do this. Given a nested class like this ...

class A
{
  //B is used to help implement A
  class B
  {
    ...etc...
  }
  ...etc...
}

... you can always move the inner/nested class to global scope, like this ...

class A
{
  ...etc...
}

//B is used to help implement A
class B
{
  ...etc...
}

However, when B is only used to help implement A, then making B an inner/nested class has two advantages:

  • It doesn't pollute the global scope (e.g. client code which can see A doesn't know that the B class even exists)
  • The methods of B implicitly have access to private members of A; whereas if B weren't nested inside A, B wouldn't be able to access members of A unless those members were internal or public; but then making those members internal or public would expose them to other classes too (not just B); so instead, keep those methods of A private and let B access them by declaring B as a nested class. If you know C++, this is like saying that in C# all nested classes are automatically a 'friend' of the class in which they're contained (and, that declaring a class as nested is the only way to declare friendship in C#, since C# doesn't have a friend keyword).

When I say that B can access private members of A, that's assuming that B has a reference to A; which it often does, since nested classes are often declared like this ...

class A
{
  //used to help implement A
  class B
  {
    A m_a;
    internal B(A a) { m_a = a; }
    ...methods of B can access private members of the m_a instance...
  }
  ...etc...
}

... and constructed from a method of A using code like this ...

//create an instance of B, whose implementation can access members of self
B b = new B(this);

You can see an example in Mehrdad's reply.

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There is good uses of public nested members too...

Nested classes have access to the private members of the outer class. So a scenario where this is the right way would be when creating a Comparer (ie. implementing the IComparer interface).

In this example, the FirstNameComparer has access to the private _firstName member, which it wouldn't if the class was a seperate class...

public class Person
{
    private string _firstName;
    private string _lastName;
    private DateTime _birthday;

    //...

    public class FirstNameComparer : IComparer<Person>
    {
        public int Compare(Person x, Person y)
        {
            return x._firstName.CompareTo(y._lastName);
        }
    }

}
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There are times when it's useful to implement an interface that will be returned from within the class, but the implementation of that interface should be completely hidden from the outside world.

As an example - prior to the addition of yield to C#, one way to implement enumerators was to put the implementation of the enumerator as a private class within a collection. This would provide easy access to the members of the collection, but the outside world would not need/see the details of how this is implemented.

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1  
Which has the added benefit that code using such an implemented interface cannot sneakily cast the interface back to the implementing class, because it is nested and private so it cannot be referenced. –  jerryjvl Jul 4 '09 at 23:06
    
@Reed: could you edit your answer to include an example of an IEnumerable class defining its enumerator type? I'd do it, but it belongs with your answer or Mehrdad's. –  John Saunders Jul 4 '09 at 23:19
    
@John: I'd do it, but Mehrdad beat me to it :) –  Reed Copsey Jul 5 '09 at 22:26
    
@jerryjvl That is actually quite significant! +1 for sure as it keeps code even more secure. –  julealgon Jan 7 at 14:34

When nesting a type (class/enum/interface/struct/delegate) inside an outer class then that outer class effectively takes on the role of a namespace. So the reasons for nesting a type are the same as for using namespaces, be it that it tends to be more fine-grained and is used/needed less often.

That fine-grained trait makes privated/protected use more likely, but there exists a case for nested public types too, in that it helps to keep the surrounding namespace clean:

namespace Containers
{
  public class LinkedList 
  {
    public class Element { }
  }

  public class AvlTree
  {
    public class Element { }    
  }
}

I suspect (but can't find a source) that one objection against (public) nested types could be that they are not CLR compliant.

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Nested classes are very useful for implementing internal details that should not be exposed. If you use Reflector to check classes like Dictionary<Tkey,TValue> or Hashtable you'll find some examples.

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Maybe this is a good example of when to use nested classes?

// ORIGINAL
class ImageCacheSettings { }
class ImageCacheEntry { }
class ImageCache
{
    ImageCacheSettings mSettings;
    List<ImageCacheEntry> mEntries;
}

And:

// REFACTORED
class ImageCache
{
    Settings mSettings;
    List<Entry> mEntries;

    class Settings {}
    class Entry {}
}

PS: I've not taken into account which access modifiers should be applied (private, protected, public, internal)

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Unfortunately when doing this, the convention of public Settings Settings { get; set; } goes out the window. –  Dan Lugg May 31 '13 at 18:02