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I am trying to write a bootstrap algorithm in F# that takes a collection of inputs and creates a list of outputs. If I only need to use the previous element it is straightforward to use recursion :

let buildElement head previous =
    // do something to create new float 
    1.0

let buildList inputs =
    let rec bootstrap elements previous = 

        let addElement head tail =
            let newElement = buildElement head previous
            newElement :: bootstrap tail newElement   

        match inputs with
            | []    -> []
            | h::t  -> addElement h t
    bootstrap inputs 1.0

However, if I want to use the previously created elements (eg say I wanted to pass in an average of the new values as the previous value), how do I access them in the inner functions? Do I create a collection in the outer function and fill it up in the inner function? If so, do I need to make it mutable?

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1  
Note that your buildList function could just be defined as List.scan buildElement 1.0 inputs if you switch the arguments of buildElement. –  sepp2k May 31 '12 at 10:59
    
That is a fair point. I am just trying to figure out the principle, this is just a cut-down version of the actual code. –  Aidan Jun 1 '12 at 5:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you need to calculate the new value based on some information from the past values, you would essentially do the same thing as what you're doing now - instead of passing ingle last value in previous, the previous parameter could be a list of past values that you recalculate as you go.

I think it is difficult to give a better answer without knowing a specific example. However, say you wanted to calculate floating average - for that, you need the count and the sum of all previous values. You could encode that directly using recursion, or you can use Seq.scan:

[ 1.0 .. 100.0 ] 
|> Seq.scan (fun (count, sum) elem -> count + 1, sum + elem) (0, 0.0)
|> Seq.map (fun (count, sum) -> sum / float count)
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Thanks Tomas, I think I have it now. I'll put the actual code up of fssnip when it's done, I think it will be something niec. –  Aidan Jun 1 '12 at 5:13

In case of the average function you could pass the partial sum and the number of processed items around and use that calculate the average.

For a general solution, you can take the list of previous results as an argument, prepend the next result to it using :: and reverse the whole thing when you're done. This has the added benefit of making your function tail-recursive.

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if I want to use the previously created elements (eg say I wanted to pass in an average of the new values as the previous value), how do I access them in the inner functions?

This is a fold or scan (prefix fold). You're both mapping or collapsing a list into a new value, and accumulating a value that influences the result.

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