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I have the following tables in my database which I cannot change or modify. I kept the Log table simple but LogDetail is the same as in my database.

Log Table

 Id  User Department Service     Method

 21  John Sales      UserService GetUser

LogDetail Table

Id LogRef ParamName  ParamValue

30 21     FirstName  Adam
31 21     LastName   Smith     
32 21     Age        35
33 21     Gender     M

Now, I am using following query to get who searched (Adam, Smith, 35, M)

SELECT 
L.*, D1.ParamName, D2.ParamName, D3.ParamName, D4.ParamName
FROM Log as L
INNER JOIN LogDetail as D1 on L.Id = D1.LogRef
INNER JOIN LogDetail as D2 on L.Id = D2.LogRef
INNER JOIN LogDetail as D3 on L.Id = D3.LogRef
INNER JOIN LogDetail as D4 on L.Id = D4.LogRef
WHERE
D1.ParamName='FirstName' and D1.ParamValue='Adam' and
D2.ParamName='LastName' and D2.ParamValue='Smith' and
D3.ParamName='Age' and D3.ParamValue=35 and
D4.ParamName='Gender' and D4.ParamValue='M'

Is there a better way to do this?

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So you already know the detail (Adam Smith, 35, M) and are using it to lookup the method (sales, UserService, GetUser)? –  paul May 31 '12 at 9:41
    
yes, of course. These are my inputs. The opposite situation is obviously simple and has no performance issues. –  Timuçin May 31 '12 at 12:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is what happens when you use an EAV schema (key-value pairs basically)

There isn't much you can except add an index on (ParamName, ParamValue) for LogDetail. This assumes the clustered index stays as LogRef

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Fundamental issue - basically abusing (from a concept point of view) a relational database as key-value store IS possible, but complex queries like that are exactly - well - what happens then. No way around it ;) –  TomTom May 31 '12 at 9:51
    
+1 : This structure is great for storing data, but it is abysmal if you ever need to search that data. If you already have the LogRef you're fine, if you're using the data to find a particular LogRef you'll have performance issues. –  MatBailie May 31 '12 at 10:06
    
@gbn Currently LogRef is non-unique and non-clustered. Why should it be clustered? what differs? –  Timuçin May 31 '12 at 12:46
    
@Tim: My bad assumption. Basically, non-clustered indexes point to the clustered index and I assumed this. If it isn't clustered, then it needs to be in the non-clustered index. Try as as the first and last column to see what works best for you. I suspect last –  gbn May 31 '12 at 13:02

One things you can do just use Index on fields used in joining clause.

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indexes are ok but what about query? no better way? –  Timuçin May 31 '12 at 9:39
    
you want all four values in same row, so as per me there is no other way. –  Romil Kumar Jain May 31 '12 at 9:43

One way to simplify the query by creating a view that aggregates the key-value pairs into something more usable :

CREATE VIEW ViewLogUsers
AS
SELECT UFN.LogRef, UFN.ParamName AS FirstName, ULN.ParamName AS LastName, UAG.ParamName AS Age, UGE.ParamName AS Gender
FROM LogDetail AS UFN
INNER JOIN LogDetail AS ULN ON UFN.LogRef = ULN.LogRef
INNER JOIN LogDetail AS UAG ON UFN.LogRef = UAG.LogRef
INNER JOIN LogDetail AS UGE ON UFN.LogRef = UGE.LogRef
WHERE UFN.ParamName = 'Firstname' AND ULN.ParamName = 'LastName' AND UAG.ParamName = 'Age' AND UGE.ParamName = 'Gender'
GO

Then your original query becomes :

SELECT 
L.*, D1.FirstName, D1.LastName, D1.Age, D1.Gender
FROM Log as L
INNER JOIN ViewLogUsers as D1 on L.Id = D1.LogRef
WHERE D1.FirstName = 'Adam' AND D1.LastName = 'Smith' AND D1.Age = '35' AND D1.Gender = 'M'

Your performance will still be much poorer than if you'd made the table with the same structure as the view (although if you're able to use Indexed Views it'll help), but it'll be much easier to use at least.

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Thanks for adding the filter, @Dems. Both updated at the same time. –  MartW May 31 '12 at 10:21
    
it is on SQL Server 2008. With an indexed view, will it have better performance than my original query? –  Timuçin May 31 '12 at 12:43
    
Yes, but there are some limitations and design requirements ( msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191432(v=sql.105).aspx ). And if you're not using Enterprise Edition (or Developer), every query against the view will need to use the NOEXPAND hint ( technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917715.aspx ). –  MartW May 31 '12 at 13:31

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